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A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America

January 19, 2018 - April 15, 2018

Galleries 8 and 9

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A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America tells the story of extraordinary American folk art made in New England, the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and the South between 1800 and 1925. The exhibition showcases rare portraits, vivid still-life paintings, allegorical scenes, whimsical trade signs, animal sculptures, and distinctive examples of furniture from the German-American community. Created by innovative, self-taught artists, the works exemplify the breadth of American creative expression during a period of enormous political, social, and cultural change in the United States. Highlights include rare paintings by Edward Hicks, Ammi Phillips, and John Brewster, Jr., among others.

This exhibition is drawn from the Barbara L. Gordon Collection and is organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia.

<i>Dr. Nathaniel Grant Family</i>, 1835—1836, Attributed to Joseph H. Davis (American, 1811—1865), Watercolor and graphite on wove paper, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

Dr. Nathaniel Grant Family, 1835—1836, Attributed to Joseph H. Davis (American, 1811—1865), Watercolor and graphite on wove paper, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>Girl with Cat</i>, 1845—1850, Unidentified artist, Oil on canvas, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

Girl with Cat, 1845—1850, Unidentified artist, Oil on canvas, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>Still Life with Basket of Fruit</i>, 1830—1850, Unidentified artist, Oil on canvas, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

Still Life with Basket of Fruit, 1830—1850, Unidentified artist, Oil on canvas, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>The Wedding of the Turtle Doves</i>, 1907—1915, Attributed to John Scholl (German-American, 1827—1916), White pine, wire, and paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

The Wedding of the Turtle Doves, 1907—1915, Attributed to John Scholl (German-American, 1827—1916), White pine, wire, and paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>Dressing Table</i>, 1835—1840, Unidentified artist, Basswood, white pine and maple; brass; paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

Dressing Table, 1835—1840, Unidentified artist, Basswood, white pine and maple; brass; paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>Chest over Drawers</i>, 1803, Unidentified artist, Tulip poplar, brass, iron and paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

Chest over Drawers, 1803, Unidentified artist, Tulip poplar, brass, iron and paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>Girl of the Period</i>, 1870—1885, Possibly workshop of Samuel Robb (American, 1851—1928), White pine and paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

Girl of the Period, 1870—1885, Possibly workshop of Samuel Robb (American, 1851—1928), White pine and paint, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>Eagle and Flags Plaque</i>, 1875—1900, Unidentified artist, White pine, paint, and gilt, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

Eagle and Flags Plaque, 1875—1900, Unidentified artist, White pine, paint, and gilt, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

<i>The Peaceable Kingdom with the Leopard of Serenity</i>, 1835—1840, Attributed to Edward Hicks (American, 1780—1849), Oil on canvas, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection.

The Peaceable Kingdom with the Leopard of Serenity, 1835—1840, Attributed to Edward Hicks (American, 1780—1849), Oil on canvas, Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection.

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