Archive for the 'Behind the scenes' Category

Revisiting The Charleston Story: New Works on View

<em>Untitled</em>, by Nell Choate Shute
Untitled, ca. 1940s-50s, by Nell Choate Shute (American, 1898–1966), 2010.005.0002B

Have you visited the Gibbes lately? If so, you may notice new faces in the building. Yes, we do have a few new staff members, but I am referring to the new paintings and works on paper on display in The Charleston Story. Ok, they are not really new in the sense that they were just created—although a few of the works are new acquisitions—but many of these pieces have been in storage for a while so they are new to our visitors. Confused yet?

Let’s start over. Each January and July we rotate objects on display in The Charleston Story, a fabulous exhibition that showcases the range and depth of the Gibbes permanent collection. The Charleston Story is installed in nine different galleries throughout the museum and currently includes over 150 works of art. However, this is only a small fraction of the Gibbes permanent collection which contains over 1500 paintings and miniature portraits and 4000 works of art on paper! Objects are rotated in and out of the ongoing exhibition so we can share as many works as possible with our visitors. Object changes also serve a conservation purpose. Over time, all objects can change or deteriorate as a result of environmental conditions. The major environmental factors that affect the long-term preservation of objects are light, relative humidity, and temperature. Works on paper are especially susceptible to light so we store them in cool, dark containers after six months on display. How an object is handled, displayed, and stored can mean the difference between preserving it for many years or for only a short time.

Rotating objects in The Charleston Story is a group effort and requires months of pre-planning. Sara Arnold, our Curator of Collections, chooses the objects for the exhibition. She must consider how a particular piece will fit the theme of each section as well as how it will fit visually with other works in the gallery. Sara also researches each object and writes descriptions about the artist or subject matter—no small task! Once Sara selects the objects for the rotation, I enter the picture. As Director of Collections Administration, one of my responsibilities is to oversee the movement of artwork within the building. I identify an object’s storage location, remove the object from storage, and assess its overall condition. Greg Jenkins, the museum’s preparator, then completes any matting and framing required for exhibition.

Objects Being Prepared for Installation
Objects are pulled from storage and prepared for installation.

After works are chosen, conditioned, and prepared for view, we set an installation schedule. Changing out The Charleston Story can be logistically complicated due to the fact that it spans multiple galleries. For the safety of the objects, we try to complete most art installation on Mondays when the museum is closed to the public. However, try as we might, reinstallation of galleries almost always takes longer than a day, and sometimes a week! The process of hanging art work is interesting (lots of math) but not always pretty (think hammers, drills, tape measures, tool carts, and labels). If you visit the Gibbes in January or July you may see art moving around the building or encounter a roped off gallery where we are working diligently to finish the switch. We love an audience and encourage questions from our visitors.

On installation days, Greg and I first remove works from exhibit and return them safely to storage. Next, the remaining works are taken down in preparation for a new arrangement. When the gallery walls are clear, the new additions are brought into the space. We position them around the room on carpet squares or a set of “bumpers,” which are special carpeted planks that protect ornate frames. At this point, Sara is back on the scene to determine how best to arrange the pieces within the gallery, and Greg begins to install. Once the art is on the wall, he hangs the labels, removes his tools, resets the lights, and… voila, The “new” Charleston Story. The final step includes checking the condition of works removed from exhibition and updating the object locations in our collections database.

Installation in Progress
Preparator Greg Jenkins reinstalling a wall in Gallery G.

So there you have it—another behind-the-scenes look at what your friendly museum staff does with their time. Come see what’s new—I’m off to the next project!

Zinnia Willits, Director of Collections Administration, Gibbes Museum of Art

Tour highlights of the Gibbes’ collection with one of our interactive online features.

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Curatorial Perspective: An Upcoming Exhibition Takes Shape

Manifest, 2010, by Stacy Lynn Waddell

Manifest, 2010, by Stacy Lynn Waddell (American, b. 1966)

Over the next few weeks, the Gibbes collections and curatorial staff will be hard at work in preparation for the opening of Stacy Lynn Waddell: The Evidence of Things Unseen. On view September 3 – December 5, 2010, this exhibition will feature recent work by contemporary artist Stacy Lynn Waddell in her first solo museum exhibition. Waddell’s work is a fascinating blend of painting, drawing, sculpture, collage, and installation created with her innovative technique of burning, singeing, and branding paper and canvas.

Organizing an exhibition such as this is no easy task. It is truly a team effort that requires close to two years of planning. This particular exhibition began with a series of conversations between me and the artist. Together, we hatched a plan for the overall scope of the exhibition and important details such as the dates, gallery location, number of works, etc. As luck would have it, the Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro was also interested in hosting an exhibition of Waddell’s work, and a collaboration was born.

To prepare for the exhibition, I took two trips to Durham, NC to visit Stacy in her studio, along with Xandra Eden, the Curator of Exhibitions at the Weatherspoon. Studio visits are one of the best parts of my job. I get to see artwork first hand while building a relationship with the artist—important things when curating a contemporary exhibition. During our visits with Stacy, our main objective was to select the objects for the exhibition. It was important for Stacy, Xandra, and I to meet as a group and develop an object list that worked for both venues and also matched Stacy’s vision for the show.

But selecting the works in only half the story. Once the object list is finalized we need to figure out how to pack the works, ship them to the museum, and install them in the gallery. This requires hard work and ingenuity on the part of our Director of Collections Administration, Zinnia Willits, and our Director of Operations and Preparator, Greg Jenkins. Greg and Zinnia are our resident experts on all things related to art handling, movement, and installation. In the meantime, I am busy writing an essay for the exhibition brochure, preparing label copy and text panels, planning the exhibition layout, and managing all other details of the project. Did I book Stacy a hotel room for the exhibition opening? Do we have high resolution images for our marketing materials? These are the things that pop into my head at 3 o’clock in the morning…

Many, many emails and phone calls later, we are in the home stretch. I have to say, I am really looking forward to seeing this exhibition on the gallery walls, and I know Stacy is too. Come see the final results—the exhibition opens on Friday, September 3—it should be a good time.

—Pam Wall, Curator of Exhibitions, Gibbes Museum of Art

Sharing a Love of Art History with the Next Generation

Katie Gephart, summer intern, working with camper Parker Weeks.

Katie Gephart, summer intern, with camper Parker Weeks.

My name is Katie Gephart, and this summer I interned in the museum’s Education and Outreach department. In the fall, I’ll start my senior year at Washington and Lee University where I am majoring in art history and museum studies. My university professors continue to encourage my love of art history, and now—through my internship—I’ve had the opportunity to teach other students about art. My primary responsibility was assisting with the Summer Art Camp. Over the summer, I worked with elementary school students to expand the scope of their art awareness by exposing them to new media, techniques, and sources of inspiration within the Gibbes Museum. The summer camp themes included In the Forest, Go Global, and ArtStory, and each week we created special projects that both reflected these themes and introduced the campers to important artists and artistic traditions. Sharing art history with the children and helping them translate the concepts and ideas into their own work was immeasurably rewarding.

<em>April (The Green Gown)</em>, 1920, By Childe Hassam (American, 1859 – 1935). Oil on canvas; 56 x 82 1/4 in. Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Archer Huntington (1936.09.01).

April (The Green Gown), 1920, By Childe Hassam (American, 1859 – 1935). Oil on canvas; 56 x 82 1/4 in. Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Archer Huntington (1936.09.01).

Once a week, the campers went into the galleries to explore the museum’s collection and incorporated what they saw into their art projects. Last week, ArtStory focused on an artist’s ability to tell stories without words, using only form, line, and color. We looked at the large oil painting, April: (The Green Gown) by Childe Hassam—one of my favorite paintings in the collection—and asked how the woman’s story might be different if she wore a red gown instead. The group really seemed to connect to this idea and shared how different colors make them feel. Watching the kids process this important principle of art theory and apply it to their own art work was so exciting for me to observe. The Gibbes offers its campers such a special opportunity by sharing the collection, and I’ve been so grateful to share my knowledge of art with the kids and see how their techniques improve and enthusiasm for art grows.

Katie Gephardt, summer intern, Education and Outreach Department, Gibbes Museum of Art

Sally Collins, art educator, works with campers to create their own works of art.

Sally Collins, art educator, works with campers to create their own works of art.

Learn more about public programs, classes, and camp at the Gibbes Museum of Art.

Up Close and Personal with the Gibbes’ Collection

Sarah West, a summer intern in the Curatorial and Collections Departments, handles a woodblock print by Hokusai in the Gibbes collection.

Sarah West, a summer intern in the Curatorial and Collections Departments, handles a woodblock print by Hokusai in the Gibbes collection.

I have spent the past four years staring at slide after slide of art: Jasper Johns, John Singleton Copley, Jan van Eyck … and the Johns go on. As an undergraduate at the University of Virginia, I was exposed to the cultural and social implications behind these artists and their work. I memorized myriad names and dates, and I made more flashcards than I care to count. My first-year art history class was held in a massive auditorium, and the floor to ceiling projection made each piece look more and more foreboding. Over the next three years, classes moved into smaller lecture halls, and I found myself seated at a crowded conference table, discussing the monumentality of Giotto’s use of internal modeling in the Arena Chapel. As my studies became more specific, I would occasionally find the time to visit with these works face to face in museums. I would tell anyone who would listen (so usually I was talking to myself) what I knew about the work in front of me, closing my eyes and reciting the dates aloud to see if I could remember them. It would often turn out that I could only remember half of what my teacher had so eloquently lectured, and my dates were at least five years off every time.

Limehouse, 1859, by James McNeill Whistler (American, 1834 – 1903). Etching on paper. Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Anton Vreede (2004.004.0003)

Limehouse, 1859, by James McNeill Whistler (American, 1834 – 1903). Etching on paper. Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Anton Vreede (2004.004.0003)

After graduating from U.Va in May, I returned home to Charleston to begin my summer internship with the Gibbes. I knew that I would be working with Zinnia Willits, Director of Collections Administration, and Sara Arnold, Curator of Collections, but I was not quite sure what “collections” entailed. My academic bubble of names, faces, and dates had left me completely oblivious to what goes on behind the scenes in the museum world. I understood that each work of art the traveling exhibitions at the U.Va Art Museum had come from somewhere else, but I never put any thought into who had organized the exhibit, or the hard work that was required to actually prepare and transport these works from one museum to the next. In my time with the Gibbes, I have touched (with gloves) etchings by James McNeill Whistler, drawn up a condition report on a William Merritt Chase painting, and witnessed the last minute conservation of a work by Picasso. The godlike artists of my college years have become more like aged celebrities – I still revere them, but I now know how much work has gone into keeping up their glossy façades, and just how many people it takes to get them from one venue to the next.

Sarah West, summer intern, Curatorial and Collections Departments, Gibbes Museum of Art

Still Life with Fish, 1903, by William Merritt Chase (American, 1849 – 1916). Oil on canvas. Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of Anna Heyward Taylor 1947.011.0001

Still Life with Fish, 1903, by William Merritt Chase (American, 1849 – 1916). Oil on canvas. Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of Anna Heyward Taylor (1947.011.0001).

<em>Femme dans un fauteuil</em>, 1956, by Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881 – 1973). Oil on canvas; 39 ½ x 31 ½ in. Courtesy of Esther and James Ferguson.

Femme dans un fauteuil, 1956, by Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881 – 1973). Oil on canvas; 39 ½ x 31 ½ in. Courtesy of Esther and James Ferguson.

Explore more of the Gibbes’ collection in our online database.

Download the Gibbes College Internship application (PDF).

On the Street with Summer Intern Laura Kovalsky

Laura Kovalsky, Gibbes Museum summer intern, en route to distribute museum rack cards.

Laura Kovalsky, Gibbes Museum summer intern, en route to distribute museum rack cards.

My name is Laura Kovalsky, and I am a summer communications intern at the Gibbes Museum of Art. I am a rising senior at the University of Alabama, but I’m enjoying living and working in Charleston for the summer. At the Gibbes—aside from my daily responsibilities of organizing press clippings, updating information for the communications department, and attending meetings—one of the most unique things that I have been able to do is a form of grassroots marketing. The museum distributes rack cards, which are flyers describing the year’s exhibitions, to local art galleries for them to display to promote current and upcoming exhibitions. For the Gibbes, rack cards are an important communication tool because they are an easily accessible way for visitors to get information about the museum.

While walking around town to different galleries, I had the opportunity to meet and talk with gallery owners and view a wide variety of artwork. I learned about the art community in Charleston and the connection many artists feel to the beautiful landscape and the people of this city. Because I am new to the Charleston area, I enjoyed finding some of the more hidden galleries and going to places that I probably would not have known about otherwise. It was a unique way to tour the city through its art. During this process of spreading the word about the Gibbes, I was actually able to learn about local artists and the city.

Download the Gibbes College Internship application (PDF).

Behind-the-Scenes: Collections Intern Project

This fall, Laura Reece, an Art History/Arts Management major at the College of Charleston, completed a semester-long internship with the Gibbes. Over the course of twelve weeks, Laura worked with me (the Collections Manager) on a variety of projects including cataloging and photographing new acquisitions, entering information in the collections database, conducting research on artists and assisting with installation of the exhibitions, Daufuskie Island: Photographs by Jeanne Moutousssamy-Ashe and Brian Rutenberg: Tidesong

Laura Reece hanging labels in the Daufuskie Island exhibition

Laura Reece hanging labels in the Daufuskie Island exhibition

Laura also worked on what has been a multi-year, multi-intern project involving the Gibbes collection of cased photographs. The collection contains over 100 examples of early photography including daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes. These kinds of photographs were usually enclosed in miniature cases made of wood with tooled leather covers.  Cases protected the images from light, moisture, and abrasion and allowed the photographs to be easily and safely transported. Over the last three years, interns have diligently worked to better preserve and document these exceedingly rare photographs. Previous interns meticulously cataloged each item and entered the information into the collection database.  Each piece has been photographed and attempts have been made to identify the original photographer. For her part, Laura was asked to create custom flap enclosures (made of archival board) for each photograph.  Prior to this project, photographs were stored loose in archival boxes.  This storage method was not ideal as cases tended to shift each time a box was moved.  Cases also needed to be opened to see the image which required frequent handling and stress on already fragile objects.

Previous storage method for cased photographs

Previous storage method for cased photographs

Laura was given a general template for making the storage enclosures.  However, cased photographs come in many sizes which necessitated creative thinking and a little math!

Laura Reece measuring archival board

Laura Reece measuring archival board

Once the custom housings were complete, each photograph was stored safely within the flap enclosure.  Laura added the catalog number and an image to the front of each box for easy identification.

Flap enclosure

Flap enclosure

Flap enclosure, final product

Flap enclosure, final product

Enclosures were stored flat in wide archival boxes to prevent shifting and eliminate the need for stacking.
 

Cased photographs in their new storage container

Cased photographs in their new storage container

The end result is extremely satisfying to a Type-A Collections Manager such as me. The photographs are secure, organized, and can be easily identified with little handling. If we pay attention to how an object is handled, displayed, and stored, it truly can mean the difference between preserving it for many years or for only a short time. I am hopeful that our Gibbes interns have added many years to the preservation of this unique collection.

Behind the Scenes Education Program

Ashley Hall students in Jane Pelland’s 7th grade classes enjoyed two days of the Gibbes Behind the Scenes program during their Winterim. Zinnia Willits, Collections Manager, and Greg Jenkins, Facilities Manager, led the program. The students enjoyed learning about the care of art work, exhibition installation, and the various duties of the museum’s curatorial staff. 

Interested in booking this program for your group? Contact Rebecca Williams at (843) 722-2706, ext. 41.

zinnia class 002

Behind the Scenes: Art on the Road

Did you know that works from the Gibbes Museum of Art are currently hanging in museums in Philadelphia and Houston? Since February 2008, the painting, Ms. Johnson (Estelle), by Barkley Hendricks (American, b. 1945), has been traveling in the major exhibition, Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool. Organized by The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Birth of the Cool is the artist’s first career retrospective and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. While Ms. Johnson is missed, we are proud that over the past two years more than 75,000 people have seen this painting at institutions across the country including the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Santa Monica Museum of Art, and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The exhibition is currently on view at the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston, Texas. We look forward to her return in May 2010. You can be sure she will have good travel stories. 

Ms. Johnson (Estelle), by Barkley Hendricks

Ms. Johnson (Estelle), by Barkley Hendricks

If you find yourself in Philadelphia between February and August, 2010, check out the Gibbes portrait of Mrs. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (Sarah Middleton) by Henry Benbridge at the National Constitution Center. 

Mrs. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (Sarah Middleton), ca. 1774, by Henry Benbridge

Mrs. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (Sarah Middleton), ca. 1774, by Henry Benbridge

This striking painting features prominently in the exhibition, Ancient Rome & America, which showcases the cultural, political, and social connections between ancient Rome and modern America. Sarah Middleton Pinckney is exhibited among a collection of rare artifacts and artwork borrowed from major museums in both the United States and Italy. The exhibition runs from February 19 through August 1, 2010. 

Loans from our collection are also on view at venues closer to home. Don’t miss the Gibbes painting of Mary Ann Bentham (Mrs. Thomas Grange Simons) by Thomas Wightman and the miniature portrait of Mrs. Nathaniel Russell Middleton (Anna Elizabeth De Wolf), 1842 by Anne Hall, featured in Aisle Style: 150 Years of Wedding Fashion at the Charleston Museum through September 2010. 

Miniature portrait of Mrs. Nathaniel Russell Middleton (Anna Elizabeth De Wolf) currently on loan to The Charleston Museum

Miniature portrait of Mrs. Nathaniel Russell Middleton (Anna Elizabeth De Wolf) currently on loan to The Charleston Museum

One behind-the-scenes note about objects on loan: before a piece from the collection is approved for loan to another institution, the curatorial staff must review the object’s condition to make sure it is stable enough to make the trip. An in-depth condition assessment of Mrs. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney revealed that the painting itself was in good condition however the original 18th century frame had a few issues. As a result, the National Constitution Center paid for the necessary frame conservation as a requirement of loan. Nancy Newton, a frame conservator and gilder here in Charleston, worked on the frame to stabilize flaking gilt and fill areas of loss.  The painting with newly conserved frame left for Philadelphia in late January.

Mrs. Pinckney traveled to Philadelphia in this custom-built crate

Mrs. Pinckney traveled to Philadelphia in this custom-built crate

Behind-the-Scenes at the Gibbes

Hi there. It’s me again, Zinnia Willits, the Collections Manager at the Gibbes. In my previous post I shared an insider’s look at transporting artwork in crates and soft-pack materials.  However, sometimes it is impossible to pack artwork in a crate or slip case. Here is an example:

Foundation, 2004, by Juan Logan (American, b. 1946), © Rick Rhodes Photography

Foundation, 2004, by Juan Logan (American, b. 1946), © Rick Rhodes Photography

This sculpture, titled Foundation, 2004, by North Carolina artist Juan Logan, was featured in the 2008 exhibition, Landscape of Slavery: The Plantation in American Art.  It consists of 42 blocks made of cast ductile iron (the same iron used for railroad ties). Each block weighs 90lbs for a combined total weight of 3780lbs! Packing and shipping this piece presented an unusual challenge. Thankfully, Juan had shipped the sculpture before and put my mind at ease that movement was actually possible. The sculpture arrived on three pallets with fourteen blocks on each pallet. The blocks were interleaved with cardboard to prevent scratching and each pallet was enclosed in shrink-wrap.JB wrapping pallet 

Pallet

Pallets were moved off the art truck at our loading dock and transported through the museum on pallet jacks. This was probably the most difficult part of the process given the weight of each pallet. Did I mention you have to be strong to work here? Once in the Rotunda Gallery, the sculpture was unwrapped and rebuilt.

Greg Jenkins and former Preparator Jonathan Brilliant disassemble and re-pack Foundation

Greg Jenkins and former Preparator Jonathan Brilliant disassemble and re-pack Foundation

Foundation deinstall2

Teamwork is a huge part of moving and installing artwork. Each member of the installation crew must be perfectly in sync to ensure the safety of the artwork and the art handlers. We are fortunate to have such a great team at the Gibbes!

Check back soon for the next installment of Behind-the-Scenes at the Gibbes. And as always, feel free to post a comment or email me with questions or suggestions.

Behind-the-Scenes at the Gibbes

Hello to all the Gibbes blog readers! My name is Zinnia Willits and I am the Collections Manager here at the Gibbes. What is a Collections Manager you ask? In the simplest terms, I manage the museum’s art collection and make sure it is well cared for whether in storage, on exhibit, or on loan to another museum. There are many facets to this job; continue to read our blog and you will get a glimpse of some of them!  I will be posting occasionally about work we do behind-the-scenes to bring you the spectacular exhibitions you have come to expect from the Gibbes. A great deal of planning, time, muscle, and design goes into each exhibition we present. Everything from object placement to gallery color to light levels has been carefully considered. We have a great exhibit team here at the Gibbes. Our staff is small but dynamic and we are used to working hard to achieve great things!

Associate Curator Pam Wall working on vinyl signage

Associate Curator Pam Wall working on vinyl signage

Facility Manager/Preparator Greg Jenkins setting lights in the Main Gallery

Facility Manager/Preparator Greg Jenkins setting lights in the Main Gallery

Today I want to talk a little bit about traveling exhibitions that invovle artwork on loan to the Gibbes.

How does artwork travel to the Gibbes? 

Most artwork borrowed for exhibition is transported to the Gibbes via fine art shipping. Fine art shipping is the safest way to move art from point A to point B. All art trucks are climate controlled, have air-ride suspension and lift gates, state-of-the-art security systems, and are driven by trained art handlers.

Fine art truck on the road

Fine art truck on the road

Those not familiar with art shipping are usually shocked when they find out the cost to transport a small crate a short distance. Yes, it’s expensive, but so is the artwork. Every precaution is taken to protect works moving across the state, country, or world.  The peace of mind fine art transport provides both lender and borrower is priceless. Art shipping has grown into a booming industry complete with its own professional organizations and conferences. 

Packing Art for Transit: Crates 

Most exhibitions are packed for transit in one of two ways: crated or soft-packed. Museum-quality crates are built for works that are extremely fragile or have to travel long distances for long stretches of time. Building travel crates is an art form in itself and is carried out with precision and high quality materials. Many fine art shipping companies provide crate construction services. These days it is wise to have a fine art company build your crates as there are numerous shipping restrictions (with more added every day) on the types of wood that can be used, size of crates that can travel via air, method of packing, etc. Depending on the nature of the artwork, crates are usually lined with archival, custom-fit materials with names such as Tyvek, Ethafoam, or Volara and have impact-resistant fiberglass or plywood walls.

Standard crate built for an exhibition that traveled for two years

Standard crate built for an exhibition that traveled for two years

This crate was outfitted with archival boxes to transport quilts

This crate was outfitted with archival boxes to transport quilts

Crates can be simple (for two-dimensional artwork) or complex (such as those constructed for ceramics or sculpture). Specialized crates can be outfitted with a travel frame designed to protect paintings with fragile surfaces. Travel frames attach to the back of a painting and allow free space around the face and sides of the work making it possible to pack and unpack with very little handling.

Crate with travel frame. Notice how the work seems to float in the frame.

Crate with travel frame. Notice how the work seems to float in the frame.

Packing Art for Transit: The “Soft-Pack”

One final comment on museum crates. They are expensive. That being said, there is an alternative to crating: the soft-pack. Yes, this is a made-up word, but those of us who deal with art shipping use it quite a bit. Soft-pack can be an acceptable packing solution but one must consider the condition, medium, and fragility of a work, how long it will travel, how far it will travel, and what mode of transportation it will take. Although soft-pack styles vary, there are basic guidelines for understanding what this means. Generally, to soft-pack a work means to wrap it with a moisture barrier (such as plastic, glassine, or bubble wrap) and then create a custom box (usually made from sheets of cardboard) to surround the artwork. This is also referred to as a slip case.

Brian Rutenberg paintings in slip cases

Brian Rutenberg paintings in slip cases

Collections Manager Zinnia Willits unwrapping a slip-cased painting

Collections Manager Zinnia Willits unwrapping a slip-cased painting

Soft-packing works for transit is cost-effective and can be done safely. The current exhibition of works by Brian Rutenberg arrived in slip cases. This type of packing made the most sense for these paintings. They are in excellent condition and shipped directly from the Jerald Melberg Gallery in Charlotte, North Carolina to the Gibbes. They will return in the same direct manner when the exhibition closes in January. The Melberg Gallery created top-of-the-line slip cases and added special touches such as padded frame corners and folded tape edges which made unpacking much easier!

So there you have it, some information on art packing and transit and a sneak peek at our galleries in the midst of installation. There are other cool things we do to make the exhibitions great but more on that in the next installment of Behind-the-Scenes at the Gibbes. By the way, if there is something you want me to write about or you have a question about art handling, storage, transportation, packing, etc. feel free to post a comment here or drop me an email at zwillits@gibbesmuseum.org.

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