Archive for the 'Events' Category

The Art & Heart of Philanthropy

Why is giving back important to the community? This was the theme of a recent panel discussion hosted by the Gibbes Museum of Art and the Center for Women. The “Art & Heart of Philanthropy” panel discussion was held at The Sanctuary on Kiawah Island on Tuesday, January 14, and featured four prominent, local women who are passionate philanthropists. Panelists Laura Gates, Carolyn Hunter, Susan Romaine, and Anita Zucker spoke with moderator Jane Perdue about the art of giving back.

The Art & Heart of Philanthropy at the Sanctuary on Kiawah Island

Guests attending the Art & Heart of Philanthropy panel discussion at the Sanctuary on Kiawah Island.

As the marketing manager for the museum, I had been preparing for the event for some time, and was looking forward to it on a personal level because I was seeking inspiration. When I was young, my dad was very involved with our small town community in Vermont, and worked hard to model this behavior to my sister and me. However, instead of being inspired, I often dragged my heels and complained when he took us to a nursing home to sing carols on Christmas Eve, or pulled us out of the house to help build the town playground. Those memories are more than three decades old, and now it’s my turn to introduce the concept of giving back to my children. As the mother of three boys, I finally understand what dad was trying to do, but I don’t know how to do it. So, I was looking forward to hearing what these women would share about getting involved with the community.

I recorded several of the questions and answers I found most inspiring during the conversation to share with you below. Moderator Jane Perdue began with asking the women to explain why giving back was important to them.

A. Susan Romaine, a nationally recognized artist, said she starting giving out of a sense of gratitude. “I gave to Planned Parenthood because they offered me free health services and enabled me to be healthy when I was young and didn’t have any money.” As she grew older and earned more money, she began to widen her giving reach, and shared her time and money with other non-profits. Carolyn Hunter, President of C&A Unlimited, and owner of three local McDonald’s franchises, said giving back is important to her because “we need to share what we have with others.” Anita Zucker, Chairperson and CEO for the InterTech Group, said her parents were Holocaust survivors who taught her that if you don’t have the money, give your time. Laura Gates, Board President of the Carolina Art Association/Gibbes Museum of Art, said she is motivated to give back because she feels very fortunate. Laura began her philanthropy when she was young by giving $5 to her alma matter, Wellesley College, because she wanted to participate. “There is a thrill associated with giving,” Laura added. “Endorphins are released and there is a ‘giving high.’”

Q. In their book Reinventing Fundraising, the authors describe six reasons women are motivated to give:  create, change, connect, collaborate, commit and celebrate. Do any of these six resonate with you? And if so, why?

A. Carolyn Hunter said her reasons for giving were to Change and Celebrate. She said, “I want to know how I can get more African American women from the community involved.” Laura Gates said her reasons for giving were to Change and Create because “educated women will change the world.”

Q. What are your thoughts on how to get children participating in and learning about philanthropy?

A. Anita Zucker explained that when her children were young, she took them with her to volunteer at Crisis Ministries. “It’s important to show your children how other people live, then they understand that everything they do has an impact,” she explained. Susan Romaine agreed and said when her daughter was young that she tried to lead by example. “At the end of the day my daughter wanted me to stay home with her, but I explained to her that this was important work. Sometimes I would take her with me to volunteer or attend a meeting so she could see what it was all about.”

Q. The Women’s Philanthropy Institute writes, “Women have traditionally been heralded for their generations of life-changing service to society. But today, women are not limited to contributions of service as they are achieving full confidence in their capabilities as financial donors.” You all certainly embody this transformation! What advice do you offer to other women in gaining confidence relative to money and influence?

A. Susan Romaine said that nothing is too small. “Give $5, $10, or $1,000 and you will feel empowered!” Anita Zucker agreed and said that she began giving in increments of $18 and called it ‘bite-sized pieces.’ “Then you can inspire people through your giving,” she said. Laura Gates added that women need to understand their financial situation so they can give in their lifetime. “Enjoy giving now,” she encouraged the audience.

Carolyn Hunter summed up the discussion with the simple phrase: “The more I give, the more I get.”

I left the discussion feeling empowered, and realized that I didn’t have to follow in my father’s exact footsteps and make my boys sing carols at Christmas, but that I could create my own path of giving. I could follow the panelist’s advice and lead by example.

Amy Mercer, Marketing and Communications Manager, Gibbes Museum of Art

 

Curating Conversations

As a Programming & Events intern this semester, I’ve had the great opportunity to share the room with some pretty remarkable people. This list includes guests of the Gibbes such as Jeff Rosenheim of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Charleston’s own Jonathan Green, artist Louise Halsey (daughter of Corrie McCallum and William Halsey), Lieutenant Governor Glenn McConnell, and Estée Lauder chairman emeritus Leonard Lauder. But the Gibbes has some remarkable people of its own. Its entire staff—from Executive Director Angela Mack to the custodian Russell Morrison—realizes the importance of museums as places to bring art and people together. The Gibbes staff is composed of hard workers who are dedicated to the success of the museum’s mission, to preserve and promote the art of this unique city.

Lieutenant Governor Glenn McConnell at the Gibbes Museum.

Lieutenant Governor Glenn McConnell speaks to a group of visitors in the Photography and the Civil War exhibition.

To some, museums appear to be passive temples of art where visitors must be silent and detached. But the Gibbes is so invested in this community; they seek to promote an active conversation between their collection, their programs, and the public. And to initiate such great conversations, the Gibbes is bringing some really good stuff to our city.

Traveling from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the exhibition Photography & the American Civil War presents intimate snapshots of life during the war—battlefields, street scenes, political propaganda, portraits of the young and the old. The exhibition also shows how photography influenced how we perceive the Civil War today. I was fortunate enough to talk with the Met’s curator in charge of the Department of Photography, Jeff Rosenheim, when he visited for the exhibit’s opening. He was incredibly knowledgeable about photography and its history and uses. But what impressed me most was his deep passion for the impact of photography. Jeff explained to me how photography is accessible, perhaps more so than any other medium, and how this justifies its instant popularity. He explained how photography is a democratic medium, an art form for everyone.

Photography and the American Civil War

Visitors explore the Photography and the American Civil War exhibition at the Gibbes.

I believe this idea of democracy and art for all can also be found in the Gibbes’s mission. They strive to present art and programming that is relatable to everyone. Their art speaks, and is, Charleston’s history—our history. If you love our city, then there is absolutely no way that you could not love what the Gibbes has to offer. I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity I’ve had this semester to work with such a dedicated team of art managers who care so greatly about art and its influence in Charleston. Like I mentioned above, the Gibbes team is truly committed to their work in this community and this is what will always stick with me long after my internship is over. I know what I’ve learned here will benefit me wherever I end up in the art world, and I’m proud to call Charleston, the Gibbes, and its great art my starting point.

Intern Amelia Roland

Intern Amelia Roland stands next to a painting by Robert Gordy at the Gibbes.

Amelia Roland, Public Programs & Marketing Intern and guest blogger

Esther Ferguson: A Woman with a Vision

Esther Ferguson is small in stature, but her dedication to the Gibbes Museum is immense. A long-time supporter of the museum, she joined the Gibbes Board in the spring of 2013. I sat down with her recently to talk about the inspiration behind The Distinguished Lecture Series.

Esther Ferguson at the Gibbes Museum of Art.

Esther Ferguson at the Gibbes Museum of Art.

Fifty years ago Esther Ferguson was a young woman alone in Manhattan. She traded the security of Hartsville, South Carolina, for the great unknown of New York City. “I was scared. Women didn’t do that sort of thing back then. I was very poor and on the weekend, I would go alone to The Metropolitan Museum to listen to the lecture series. I remember walking out of a lecture and sitting down to cry because I’d learned so much about the art world, and because I realized how much more there was to learn!” The experience was nurturing during an unsettling time in her life. “Attending these lectures kept me going throughout the week,” she explained.

The significance of the Met lecture series stayed with Mrs. Ferguson throughout the years, and after returning to the south, she began to dream about bringing a lecture series to Charleston. In 2010, the Fergusons loaned works of art from their private collection to the Gibbes Museum to form the exhibition, Modern Masters from the Ferguson Collection. Two mixed-media works by world-renowned installation artists Christo and Jeanne Claude were part of the exhibition, which ran from April 30–August 22, 2010. As part of Modern Masters, Christo was invited to speak about his large-scale temporary works of art including the wrapping of the Reichstag in Berlin and the Pont-Neuf bridge in Paris, the 24 ½-mile-long Running Fence in Sonoma and Marin Counties in California, and The Gates in New York City’s Central Park.

Esther-Ferguson-Christo-JuliaLynnPhoto

Esther Ferguson with artist Christo.

“At the end of his stunning lecture, it was the men who clapped the loudest,” recalls Mrs. Ferguson. “After the lecture these men gathered around Christo and told him they didn’t know if they liked his work, but they understood it. That’s when I knew art could fill stadiums.” She smiled.

The Old Mill, ©Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York; by Pablo Picasso, oil on canvas; 15 x 18 inches, Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Trust.

The Old Mill, ©Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York; by Pablo Picasso, oil on canvas; 15 x 18 inches, Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Trust.

Mrs. Ferguson began to formulate her plan to establish a fund to create the Distinguished Lecture Series at the Gibbes Museum. She had the perfect speaker in mind, her friend of thirty years, Mr. Leonard Lauder. “Every time you see him it’s art, art, art,” she laughed. Mr. Lauder’s attention to art became evident to the world at large last spring when he donated his $1.5 billion collection of Cubist art to the very museum that brought Mrs. Ferguson to tears all those years ago. In a Vanity Fair article, Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas P. Campbell (who visited the Gibbes museum in October) said of the donation, “In one fell swoop this puts the Met at the fore-front of early-20-century art.” Mrs. Ferguson decided she would ask her friend and philanthropist, Leonard Lauder, to be the inaugural Distinguished Lecture speaker. “He is a very private man, but when I asked he said yes. I’ll do this for you Esther.”

Leonard A. Lauder

Leonard A. Lauder, Chairman Emeritus, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Chairman Emeritus, The Estee Lauder Companies Inc.

We are so fortunate to have friends like Mrs. Ferguson who are working to bring outstanding, world-renowned artists, art collectors, museum leaders, philanthropists, and art historians to Charleston to stimulate discussion about the visual arts and creativity. We are already planning for future speakers and are excited about the future of the Distinguished Lecture Series!

Amy Mercer, marketing and communications manager, Gibbes Museum of Art

The inaugural lecture in the Distinguished Lecture Series, featuring Leonard A. Lauder, is Wednesday, November 20. A limited number of tickets are still available for this event at gibbesmuseum.org/events or by calling 843.722.2706 x21.

Create and Educate—Preserving a Legacy

Harkening back to traditions set by the trail blazers of dance, a “Renaissance” is afoot in the Charleston arts scene. Arts collaboration breeds fresh new ideas and brings new works to the forefront. As the co-founder and director of the Charleston Dance Institute (CDI), I am excited to share our involvement in the creation of a new ballet.

Wheels started turning at a meeting of the minds between CDI co-founder Stephen Gabriel, composer Laura Ball, and me. After endless cups of coffee, brainstorming sessions, and in-depth conversations on artistic philosophies and goals The Little Match Girl collaboration was born. Through this process I found out that not only did Laura and I have matching outlooks on art and music but that we were in very similar places in our professional careers—we both have a dual passion to create and educate. We are true contemporaries and that led to a synergy that was instant and second nature. Having a cohesive composer-choreographer bond does not often occur in one’s career and finding that as a choreographer is a real gift. Live performance art is a fleeting moment that can never be duplicated, so we agreed that having live accompaniment for this project was a must. Live music and dance is a time honored tradition but in these times a real treat. I can’t wait to hear the talented musicians of Chamber Music Charleston bring this score to life. It is just as invigorating for a musician to play a world premiere piece as it is for a dancer to dance the steps for the very first time. It will truly be a memorable experience for all. I am thrilled and honored to have The Little Match Girl be presented for the Gibbes Museum’s Art with a Twist series as our first of many new works to come.

Cellist Tim O'Malley and Charleston Dance Institute Dancers. Photo by Tom McCorkle

Cellist Tim O’Malley and Charleston Dance Institute Dancers. Photo by Tom McCorkle

I’ve been asked many times, “Why The Little Match Girl?” There are many holiday characters and tales out there, so why choose this particular story? I often don’t have the time to elaborate and the superficial answer becomes, “because I like it.” But of course the choice to me was much deeper than that, and I do my best to take the time to explain why. This story sweeps the spectrum of themes and emotions and that in turn provides so much fodder to the imagination and potential for creation. As a choreographer, I am always looking for that spark of something special for inspiration, but just as importantly as an arts educator, I look for projects that will enhance the growth and training of my pupils. The process of growing as a artist is multifaceted and collaborating on this story has been a perfect opportunity to expand the minds and talents of the young dancers at the Charleston Dance Institute.

Sarah Masser will dance the lead in The Little Match Girl performance

Sarah Masser will dance the lead in The Little Match Girl performance.

As a choreographer, my role is to project my artistic vision through the dancers’ movements but I also have a duty to develop these dancers’ abilities. Relying on dancers’ strengths, while pushing boundaries within their minds and bodies, always produces the most tangible choreography. It becomes much more personal and seamlessly transcends to the audience members. Having a role created around you is a unique experience that even seasoned professionals long for, let alone an aspiring ballerina of 14 years of age. Sarah Massar, pictured above, has been cast in the title role of The Little Match Girl. When I asked what the experience of being the little match girl has meant to her, this is what she had to say:

“Taking on this role is a life changing experience because I have never gotten the leading role and never realized how much work it actually takes. I have a lot more responsibility and have to practice a lot more; not only on the choreography but on my expressions and how it connects to the movement. It’s hard and takes a lot of time and effort, but every minute is worth it because it’s turning me into the dancer I never thought I would be.”

These words motivate and inspire me to continue to create and educate. Sweat equity is a dancer’s life—actually, an artist’s life—and I can’t wait for all of the hard work by this incredible team of collaborators to be shared with our community.

Jonathan Tabbert, co-founder/director of the Charleston Dance Institute, and guest blogger

The Gibbes Museum is pleased to present a special performance of The Little Match Girl with Laura Ball, the Charleston Dance Institute, and Chamber Music of Charleston, on Saturday, November 16 at 11am.

The performance will be held across the street from the museum at the Circular Congregational Church. Following the performance, the audience is invited to the museum for a meet and greet with the performers, and to see the exhibitions on view.

Purchase tickets online or call 843.722.2706 x21.

A Successful Second Year for the Gibbes Art on Paper Fair

After months of preparation, this weekend the museum welcomed more than 1800 visitors for the second-annual Art on Paper Fair. In the days leading up to the event, art work was carefully taken off the walls in the Alice Smith and Garden galleries, and the Gibbes was transformed into a bustling community of artists, gallery owners, art collectors, art experts, volunteers, staff and curious onlookers. Vendors included eight galleries from across the southeast that showcased works celebrating the south and this year, we added new elements including the “Ask the Expert” booth and an Artisan Boutique.

Guests at the First Look Celebration perused the works of art for sale.

Guests at the First Look Celebration perused the works of art for sale.

Thankfully the rain held off and the fair opened on Friday night with the First Look Celebration. Guests enjoyed delicious treats from local food trucks, music and drinks. As a fan of anything with bacon, my personal favorite was the pimiento cheese, muenster, avocado, and bacon on sourdough sandwich made by Cory’s Famous Grilled Cheese. My colleague Justa Debnam of skirt! magazine and Where Charleston agreed. “Attending the party with fellow Gibbes supporters on Friday was extraordinary. It was such a treat to be part of a diverse and passionate group of Charleston’s arts community,” she said.

Food Trucks at the Art on Paper Fair

Food trucks lined up in front of the museum to provide delicious treats for the First Look Celebration.

Making art accessible to the public was the impetus behind the initial Art on Paper Fair. As a relative newcomer to the museum, I wasn’t around for the first fair, and so I asked Pam Wall, Gibbes curator of exhibitions, to elaborate on the intent of the fair. “It’s a good opportunity to learn about and be more comfortable around art. We offer free admission to the Art on Paper Fair in hopes that it will encourage the public to come into the museum to browse through the works on paper and to talk with the gallery owners. The fair helps to eliminate the intimidation factor.” Local artist Jonathan Green agreed, saying: “Works on paper are more affordable and less intimidating and will ignite a whole new culture of collectors.” His booth on the second floor displayed works of art that were twenty years old (and were pulled out of storage for this event!). Green’s early figure drawings are more linear and abstract than his contemporary oil paintings, and provided viewers a unique opportunity to glimpse the evolution of this artist’s journey. “Drawing is fundamental to being a good artist, and I’m glad I was a good student,” he laughed. The John K. Surovek Gallery of Palm Beach was a new addition to this year’s paper fair. Co-owner Clay Surovek, who participates in 2 to 3 shows including Art Basel and the American Fine Art Fair in New York, says these events provide a great opportunity to meet new clients.

Reynier-Llanes-Jonathan-Green-Paper-Fair

Artists Reynier Llanes and Jonathan Green represented Jonathan Green Studios at the Art on Paper Fair.

All weekend visitors strolled through the museum, stopping to browse through the Artisan Boutique and on to the booths where they could ask questions of gallery owners and artists. Erin Nathanson, Arts & Cultural Relations Director for ArtFields, visited the fair over the weekend. “Entering the Art on Paper Fair, I was delighted to see vendors selling handmade letterpress (Sideshow Press and Ink Meets Paper) and bound items for a very accessible price. I began my visit by sifting through many beautiful prints and monotypes—I LOVE being able to handle works and get them so close to my face that I can imagine the smell of ink and other materials through the plastic. My favorite piece was a large wood-cut print by Lese Corrigan! In all, the Art on Paper Fair was a great experience and I hope it expands. I am excited for next year,” she said. After another successful event, we are looking forward to next year’s fair too!

Amy Mercer, marketing and communications manager, Gibbes Museum of Art

Photo credits: MCG Photography

Bringing Music to Life

As the director of Chamber Music Charleston (CMC), I am always looking for new ways to share our music with Charleston audiences. We are most well known for our House Concerts—intimate evenings and afternoons of classical music presented in a private homes—but sometimes we need to do something different, something unexpected… something that will capture the attention of someone new and energize those who already know us.

CMC performs a house concert at The Palmer House on the Battery.

CMC performs a house concert at The Palmer House on the Battery. Jenny Weiss, Frances Hsieh, Debra Sherrill, Timothy O’Malley, Ben Weiss. Photo courtesy of BT Hunter Photography

When the opportunity to collaborate with Laura Ball, Charleston Dance Institute, and the Gibbes Museum of Art presented itself to us, it didn’t take much time at all for me to eagerly accept. You see, while we have collaborated in the past with some incredible local actors for Music and Spoken Word productions and have even collaborated with singers to stage a mini-opera, we have never had the change to combine our music with dance.

Even more exciting, we are not simply preparing music by a standard, great “European Classical Composer”—say, a Beethoven String Quartet or Brahms Piano Quintet. No, for this collaboration we get to bring a brand new piece of music to life. A piece of music that only months ago was a mere though in the composer’s mind but is now a fully orchestrated score, engraved on paper and in the hands of the individual musicians.

CMC cellist Timothy O'Malley

CMC cellist Timothy O’Malley (playing at the SC Aquarium). Photo courtesy of BT Hunter Photography

How does all of the music come together? First, I had to assemble the musicians based on the instrumentation for the work. Laura Ball, our fearless composer and artistic leader, chose an octet for this work: 2 violins, cello, bass, flute, oboe, percussion, and piano. It was not hard at all to find the musicians to fit the bill, as CMC has a fantastic core of local professional musicians to draw from. The CMC musicians performing for this project include violinists Frances Hsieh and Ben Weiss, cellist Timothy O’Malley, oboist Mark Gainer, and flutist Regina Helcher Yost. We added some good friends: Jean Williams on bass, James Cannon for percussion, and Tomas Jakubek for violin, and warmly welcomed composer Laura Ball to play the piano part. This past week each musician received their individual parts and have been charged with learning the notes, dynamics and tempos. On November 5, the real fun begins as we gather together for the first time to read through the music as an ensemble.

CMC violinist Frances Hsieh.

CMC violinist Frances Hsieh. Photo courtesy of CMC

What happens at this first rehearsal? I know the string players will discuss bowings—the direction that the bow runs across the strings. As a wind player (I am a bassoonist), it took me quite some time to realize how important bowings can be, but I now realize that bowings greatly affect the phrasing of a line of music; making some notes stronger than others and helping build and taper intensity to specific notes. Also, if you have two violinists playing the same music, it is nice to see their bows moving in the same directions!

CMC flutist Regina Helcher Yost

CMC flutist Regina Helcher Yost (playing at the SC Aquarium). Photo courtesy of BT Hunter Photography

For the wind players—the oboe and flute—I bet they will be focused on matching articulations (length of notes and attacks of notes) and pitch, and blending their sounds together. The ensemble as a whole will focus on making sure everyone starts every note perfectly together and changes notes at the same time. They will also work as one as they interpret dynamics and musical lines.

The goal of the musicians for this project is to interpret the notes on the page and create the musical story that will accompany the dance. It is an awesome responsibility, but one that each of our musicians take up with great gusto. There is something incredibly exciting about bringing a new piece of music to life, especially when this music is just one element of a bigger project.

I know I can’t wait to see how this all comes together, and I certainly can not wait to see the dance set to the music! It will be incredible!

Sandra Nikolajevs, president & artistic director of Chamber Music Charleston, and guest blogger

The Gibbes Museum is pleased to present a special performance of The Little Match Girl with Laura Ball, the Charleston Dance Institute, and Chamber Music of Charleston.

The performance will be held across the street from the museum at the Circular Congregational Church. Following the performance, the audience is invited to the museum for a meet and greet with the performers, and to see the exhibitions on view.

Purchase tickets online or call 843.722.2706 x21.

Score to Floor

Whew! It is such a relief to see a score fly out the door and into the arms of the orchestra!!

Last night I met with Sandra of Chamber Music Charleston and had a cursory read through of The Little Match Girl score. I am happy to say that two of my favorite themes belong to the cello. Cellists have always had a special place in my life, beginning with Ward Williams who broke my heart every time he played Julie-O by the Turtle Island String Quartet. The piece is so fascinatingly joyful and danceable and I have been in love with the cello ever since. The dancing roast in our performance is dedicated to Ward Williams, who used to play in Charleston with the band Jump Little Children.

Tim O'Malley of Chamber Music Charleston. Photo by Tom McCorkle

Tim O’Malley of Chamber Music Charleston. Photo by Tom McCorkle

The other cello theme represents the Mother figure in the Match Girl story. My boyfriend’s grandmother is a cellist and quite talented. After meeting her, I decided that only the rich, wise and hauntingly beautiful voice of the cello could represent the Motherly presence that so comforts the match girl. We are so excited to hear Tim O’Malley give voice to these two contrasting characters at the performance on November 16th! The cello is such an incredible instrument with a range of emotion, and diversity of character. I look forward to sharing my favorite instrument with you all at the Circular Church—make sure to meet Tim and his cello afterwards at the Gibbes!

Laura Ball, composer and guest blogger

The Gibbes Museum is pleased to present a special performance of The Little Match Girl with Laura Ball, the Charleston Dance Institute, and Chamber Music of Charleston.

The performance will be held across the street from the museum at the Circular Congregational Church. Following the performance, the audience is invited to the museum for a meet and greet with the performers, and to see the exhibitions on view.

Purchase tickets online or call 843.722.2706 x21.

Stroll down King Street on Second Sunday

Second Sunday on King Street is the brainchild of Susan Lucas of the King Street Marketing Group. If you haven’t come downtown for one of these events, you are missing out! With the streets closed off to traffic, King Street is transformed into a European city where strolling is a time honored tradition. Second Sunday draws tourists, locals, children, and even dogs who stroll in and out of delightful boutiques, stop for lunch at some of Charleston’s favorite restaurants, and of course, visit the Gibbes Museum.

King Street Second Sunday

The Gibbes offers three Free-Admission Sundays throughout the year. We have waived admission on select days for many years because it’s a way for us to open our doors and give back to the community. This is the first year that we have partnered with Second Sunday, and we want to encouraging strollers to continue down King Street, through the Gateway Walk next to the Charleston Library Society, and come into the museum.

Mending a Break in a Rice-Field Bank, from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties

Post-Conservation

This Sunday, July 14, visitors will have the rare opportunity to experience the stunning watercolor series, A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties, by Alice Ravenel Huger Smith. This collection is not often on display because of the fragile nature of the watercolors. Curator of Exhibitions Pam Wall wrote an earlier post “A Commitment to Conservation” about the museum’s efforts to restore and preserve the vibrant colors of the watercolor series. In the recent article, “The Quandry of Alice Ravenel Huger Smith” Post and Courier Arts Editor Adam Parker writes, “Smith was a master manipulator of watercolor, creating images, landscapes mostly, influenced by Japanese printmaking and woodblocks and romantic English art that transformed the objects of nature into symbol, myth and memory.” This exhibition will close on Sunday so the free admission day gives visitors a final chance to see the works as a whole.

The Spoleto Watercolors of Stephen Mueller and Carl Palazzolo From the Collection of David and Carol Rawle is on display in the Rotunda galleries, and People’s Choice: A Community – Curated Exhibition is on view in the Main Gallery.

This Sunday we are also excited to offer visitors the chance to meet Monica Karales, widow of award winning photographer James Karales. Come to the Museum Store from 1 – 4pm for a special book signing as Ms. Karales celebrates the release of the book documenting the life of her late husband, Controversy and Hope: The Civil Rights Photographs of James Karales, by Julian Cox with Rebekah Jacob and Monica Karales. Stunning photographs chronicling the Civil Rights Movement were on view at the Gibbes in the recent exhibition Witness to History: Civil Rights Era Photographs by James Karales.

Ms. Johnson (Estelle), 1972, By Barkley Hendricks (American, b. 1945) 

So this Sunday, take advantage of our free admission and stroll through the museum. One of the best parts about my job is that I get to do that on a daily basis. On my way into the office I am greeted by the Veiled Lady. On my way to lunch I walk past Ms. Johnson (Estelle) and on my way home at the end of the day, I pass Persephone bathing in the courtyard garden. I am so grateful to have this opportunity to surround myself with art, and am excited that our free admission days will give visitors that same opportunity. Stroll down King Street this weekend, and come say hello to Ms. Johnson.

Amy Mercer, Marketing and Communications Manager, Gibbes Museum of Art

Upcoming Free Admission Days:
Saturday, September 28, 10am – 5pm: Smithsonian Museum Day Live! Must present pass, available on smithsonianmag.com, to be eligible for free admission.
Sunday, October 13, 1 – 5pm: Second Sunday Free Admission Day
February 9, 2014, 1 – 5pm: Second Sunday Free Admission Day

Join the Gibbes Museum and see the World, or at least Chicago!

This June, I had the pleasure of traveling with a group of about thirty Gibbes Fellows to the great city of Chicago. Because the trip was planned by the Gibbes, the visual experiences were unparalleled. Many people who actually live in Chicago were involved in the planning process, so we visited the typical tourist destinations but also private homes, collections, and clubs. Even when we visited a public venue, we had a customized experience with a tour given by a museum curator or private collection owner.

The Cloud Gate, aka "The Bean," by Anish Kapoor (British (born India) 1954)

The Cloud Gate, aka “The Bean,” by Anish Kapoor in Millennium Park, Chicago.

So where did we go? On the first night we had dinner at an exquisite Art-Deco style private club in River North. The next day was a picture-perfect clear day and we strolled through Millennium Park to see “The Bean” and Frank Gehry’s Jay Pritzker Pavilion and watched the children frolicking in the “Crown Fountain” with the changing faces on our way to our private tour of the Art Institute of Chicago with its new Renzo Piano-designed modern building. We felt at home at the museum because we had lunch at the Terzo Piano restaurant.

Chicago's spectacular skyline, seen from a guided cruise on the Chicago River.

Chicago’s spectacular skyline, seen from a guided cruise on the Chicago River.

People always talk about the Chicago river cruises and there is a reason for that—we went on one and it was amazing—the knowledgeable guide (who is a volunteer docent) gave the background and description of about 50 world-class high-rise buildings that have made Chicago famous. But the day was not over for us, off we went to an elegant private home that housed a collection that rivaled the best of the Museum of Contemporary Art, all described by the knowledgeable owners. Already, we knew, this was not going to be a cookie-cutter, boring trip!

A view of Lake Michigan from a rooftop garden of a private residence.

A view of Lake Michigan from a rooftop garden of a private residence.

A mirrored sculpture installed on a private rooftop garden in downtown Chicago.

A mirrored sculpture installed on a private rooftop garden in downtown Chicago.

On Friday morning, we visited the Museum of Contemporary Art which exhibits thought-provoking art created since 1945—very cutting edge—but then we visited a private home with a rooftop garden featuring a mind-blowing array of art. Needing refreshment, we went to the Arts Club of Chicago for lunch. Although this club is private, there are works by the likes of Picasso, Klee, Matisse, Noguchi, and Braque hung casually on the wall so it is a very special place. Our next visit was a real change of pace—the Driehaus Museum which is a huge late-19th century Victorian mansion, darkly decorated with heavy wood paneling, Tiffany lamps, and highly polished stone. Later that afternoon, we went to the high-end, commercial interior-decorating studio of Suzanne Lovell so that we could learn how to live with all this fabulous art. The day came to a perfect end with cocktails in the home of a member of our group, a beautiful Art-Deco apartment in the Palmolive Building looking out over Lake Michigan and Lake Shore Drive.

The stained glass dome in the Driehaus Museum, attributed to Giannini & Hilgart.

The stained glass dome in the Driehaus Museum, attributed to Giannini & Hilgart.

On the last day, we headed out to the North Shore for house and garden tours. When we started out, it was pouring rain and we imagined that we would view those gardens with our noses pressed up against the windows of the bus. But fortunately, the rain became a mist and we toured a house and garden in Lake Bluff, right on Lake Michigan that housed a museum-quality collection of 17th and 18th century antiques, oriental carpets, oil paintings, and decorative arts—with another section housing Stickley furniture and decorative arts—talk about variety!

whimsical sculpture towers among the tree trunks

A whimsical sculpture towers among the tree trunks in a garden along the tour.

A sculpture bust peeks out from behind a hedge.

A sculpture bust peeks out from behind a hedge.

By this time, we were on top of the world, but there were more delights to come—two more world class gardens and private collections including the Chicago Botanic Garden and a visit to the Lenhardt Library, a horticultural rare book library housing million dollar editions. We ended the day with the best part—a stroll in the garden and a dinner in the handsome Winnetka home belonging to a couple in our group.

Take my advice, if the Gibbes Museum offers another trip—go for it!

Eleanor Hale, Gibbes Board Member, Adventure-seeker, and Guest Blogger

In Union there is Strength: Events at the Gibbes

Gibbes Museum Garden Gallery

Society 1858’s Habanero Rhythm event packed the house.

When I began working at the Gibbes Museum of Art in October 2012, I quickly realized that as an employee, a lot of different hats are to be worn. We are a non-profit after all! Currently, I am the events and rental coordinator for the museum, and I assist in coordinating in-house events and all outside rentals. The Gibbes is such a popular venue with requests ranging from small, intimate gatherings such as cocktail parties, dinners, and business meetings to large wedding receptions, ceremonies, and corporate events. For more than a century, the Gibbes Museum of Art has been a beacon for the visual arts in the Lowcountry region of South Carolina.

The Gibbes consists of a small staff of approximately 20 full- and part-time employees, and at one point or another, they have all assisted in planning a rental. Between our curatorial staff, development team, marketing group, facility manager, and security staff, rentals planned at the Gibbes would not be perfectly executed without the help of my colleagues. We rely on each other to make sure each client is pleased with their Gibbes experience, not only as a museum, but also as a venue.

‘Tis the Season to get Married
Working at the Gibbes has given me an abundant amount of first-hand experiences when planning the bride’s big day. One of my favorite rentals that took place at the Gibbes was Catlin and Chris Whiteside’s wedding reception. Caitlin, an event planner at Calder Clark, was, as you can imagine, highly organized and knew exactly what she wanted. Her husband Chris, aka Whitey, was a joy to be around and brought laughter to every conversation.

Wedding Ceremony in Gibbes Rotunda

A gorgeous wedding ceremony in the Gibbes Museum Rotunda gallery.

Caitlin and Chris hold special memories of the Gibbes as their first date took place in the Gibbes Courtyard, so where better a place to have their reception. The months of planning for their special day came together on Saturday, February 23. Every detail was just as Caitlin had planned, including the miniature putting green built under a side tent as a surprise for Chris. The bride and groom were happy to be married and celebrating with their closest friends and family, even with the torrential downpours that happened that evening.

As Caitlin and Chris were getting ready for their send off, soaking wet shoes and all, they kindly requested a pizza be ordered and sent to their room at Charleston Place Hotel. I got an obvious laugh out of this request, but I was more than happy to make the call to Domino’s. I mean who wouldn’t want to end their wedding night with a hot pizza delivery to your suite?

A Hard Days Night
Being able to connect with different businesses through various Gibbes’ rentals has provided me a large professional and social network. Different companies throughout the nation utilize the Gibbes as a venue for dinners, holiday parties, receptions, etc. Some of these corporate rentals have brought the Gibbes new members. Recently, we were fortunate to host Carriage Properties, a longtime supporter of the Gibbes. They held a large party attended by more than 300 people that included clients and friends.

Gibbes Courtyard Family Circle Cup event

A sponsor event during the Family Circle Cup, featuring the Lee Brothers, in the Gibbes Courtyard.

The doors could not have opened any sooner as guests waited patiently to enter the Gibbes. Carriage Properties and Gibbes’ guests filed in for the mix and mingle. New homeowners to Charleston were pleased to have an opportunity to visit the museum and learn about its many programs and events. And, many people, longtime Charlestonians had not visited the museum in a while and enjoyed their return.

A Historic Venue
The Gibbes Museum of Art is the Lowcountry’s leading cultural institution, the premier collection of art focusing on the American South, a dynamic resource for visual learning, and one of Charleston’s most beloved and distinguished landmarks. The exceptional education programs at the Gibbes preserves and promotes the art of Charleston and the American South. Between art lectures, performances, and fundraisers, the Gibbes calendar has a busy event schedule. Along with the Gibbes events are the booming rentals which bring in an additional 700 guests per month and serve as an additional revenue source.

Gibbes Museum Courtyard, Art of Design event

The Art of Design luncheon and lecture in the Gibbes Courtyard.

I hope you will consider the Gibbes Museum as a rental for your next event. I am always available to assist in your planning needs. Please feel free to contact me at jclem@gibbesmuseum.org.

Jena Clem, Events & Rental Coordinator, Gibbes Museum of Art

Download a PDF of our Rentals brochure for more information about making the Gibbes Museum of Art the location of your next great event!

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