Archive for the 'Events' Category

An Art on Paper Fair for Everyone

For several years I have been dreaming of hosting an art fair at the Gibbes. I could see it perfectly in my mind: booths of beautiful artwork, a festive opening night party, and the museum bustling with visitors in search of the perfect work of art to take home. I am absolutely thrilled that this vision will become a reality as the Gibbes hosts our first ever Art on Paper Fair the weekend of November 2–4, 2012, in conjuction with the Charleston Fine Art Dealers’ Association Fine Art Annual weekend.

Several people have asked, “What exactly is an Art on Paper Fair?” To give you the basics, the Gibbes has invited 12 galleries to set up booths in the museum and offer works of art for sale. We have chosen to focus on works on paper, which includes prints, drawings, pastels, photographs, watercolors and oils on paper. Throughout the weekend, visitors will be able to enter the museum free of charge and peruse the works of art for sale, while also enjoying the wonderful exhibitions on view. Each booth will be manned by gallery representatives, all willing to explain the artists and various works of art available for purchase. The great thing about works on paper is that they are available in a wide price range. Whether this is your first art purchase or you are a seasoned collector, come join us. And even if you just want to learn more about art, this is the perfect opportunity. We are offering daily curator-led tours and artist demonstrations throughout the weekend. And like I mentioned, the gallery representatives are more than willing to share their knowledge, so don’t be shy about asking questions—they are wonderful resources for learning about art and building a personal collection.

For the complete Art on Paper Fair schedule, list of participating galleries, and more, visit the Gibbes website. The weekend kicks-off on Friday, November 2, with the opening night preview party Rock, Scissors, Art on Paper hosted by our Society 1858 auxiliary group. On November 3 and 4 the entire museum is free and open to the public, so bring a friend and come see what the Art on Paper Fair is all about!

Angela Mack, Executive Director, Gibbes Museum of Art

Hunley Park Elementary Adds Scenic Views for Charleston Marathoners

Mrs. Coyle’s fourth grade art classes at Hunley Park Elementary School have been on a “Grand Tour” in true Charlestonian fashion, visiting Greece, Italy, Egypt, Japan, and Africa to learn about the art and culture of these far away lands. After touring the world, we decided to construct our own globe. Over the past sixteen weeks, eighty fourth graders have constructed a paper-mache globe that is six feet in diameter!

I am very proud and impressed with how hard these students worked, and how enthusiastic they were about the project. Every day, they come to class eager to get to work. I have enjoyed working with Mrs. Coyle and her students immensely. I hope they have learned half as much from me as I have from them.

The globe will be on display January 13 – 15 along the course of the Charleston Marathon, which benefits the Youth Endowment for the Arts. I could have not done this project without the support of the teachers and parents of Hunley Park Elementary School. Thank you so much!!

—Chessie McGarity, Gibbes Museum Teaching Artist and guest blogger

Community Days for Everyone

Cassandra Whiteside creates her own artwork.

Cassandra Whiteside creates her own artwork. Photo by Julia Lynn

As the Associate Curator of Education, Community Days are a highlight of my job. I organize these family-friendly, free days four times a year. But Community Days are not just for families. I love seeing young adults or elderly couples walking through the galleries. It warms my heart to think that by making the day free and accessible, new visitors may walk through our doors. I hear much too often that parents are scared to bring their children to an art museum for fear that they will talk too loud or touch something. My hope is that Community Days help everyone realize museums can be fun for all ages.

A young artist at work in the galleries.

A young artist at work in the galleries.

A volunteer helps with face painting activities.

A volunteer helps with face painting activities.

Our collection is so important to Southern culture and history. We make it a priority to provide opportunities for visitors to enjoy our galleries without a fee. This year we are able to do so with the help of Roper St. Francis Healthcare, and in past years we had the support of the Junior League of Charleston. Both the Junior League and Roper have helped us not only financially, but as importantly, by supplying wonderful volunteers to help me staff these days. For example, the volunteers act as ambassadors for the museum by meeting and greeting visitors and managing the hands-on art activities.

A choir from Blessed Sacrament School sings carols in the Rotunda gallery.

A choir from Blessed Sacrament School sings carols in the Rotunda gallery.

I strive to have music or dance performances at each event. In the past we have had groups such as local church and school choirs, a Charleston Academy of Music student, a local ballet troupe, and even an up-and-coming teen rock band! Roper physician Dr. Johnny Weeks will perform at this Saturday’s event. Yes, doctors are multi-talented and enjoy the arts, too!

The 3 Dudes on the front steps of the Gibbes.

The 3 Dudes perform on the front steps of the museum.

I like to think that Community Day visitors will return for more artistic inspiration down the road. Maybe they will become members, bring a friend the next time, or just reflect on an artwork that brings back good memories. We are Charleston’s only visual art museum. We belong to this community and it is my job to make our galleries accessible to everyone… at least four times a year!

A family explores the galleries together.

A family explores the galleries together.

I hope you will join us for an upcoming Community Day on December 10, February 25, or April 21, from 10am – 1pm.

Rebecca Sailor, Associate Curator of Education, Gibbes Museum of Art

An Eventful Summer

Curator Sara Arnold and intern Amanda Breen, in front of Gibbes Street Party festivities.

When I arrived in Charleston in May after two days and just over a thousand miles in the car, I wasn’t completely sure of what I was getting myself into. A new city, a new work experience, and new people to meet was exciting, but also a little terrifying. Looking back over the three months I spent as the Media Relations/Communications intern at the Gibbes Museum, I’m happy to report that Charleston, the Gibbes, and all the people I have worked with and met have truly made this an unforgettable experience!

When I decided to go back to school for a certificate in museum studies, almost two years after completing my undergraduate degree, I never would have imagined I would end up in Charleston, SC. I had always heard wonderful things about the city, so as my final semester approached I began doing a little research on the museums in the area where I might be able to apply for an internship. The Gibbes Museum caught my attention right away, not only for its collection and exhibitions, but for its unique history and true commitment to South Carolina’s artistic heritage. Since I wasn’t able to visit and interview with the museum in person, I spoke on the phone with Marla Loftus, the Director of Museum Relations, who offered me the position of Media Relations/Communications Intern for the summer. I knew this would be a great opportunity to learn about and participate in the marketing and events departments of a museum. My second day at the Gibbes, the museum hosted its annual Street Party, a fabulous and exciting way to kick off my internship and the summer. Shutting down one of the busiest streets in Charleston, amazing food, and great entertainment is probably not the norm after less that 48 hours at a new position, but I wasn’t going to complain!

Over the past three months, I’ve had a chance to work with a variety of people within the museum, but have primarily assisted the Director of Museum Relations. From posting press releases online, to fulfilling donation requests and organizing media coverage of the museum and its programs, I’ve enjoyed getting to know the museum and Charleston from an insider’s perspective. One of my favorite parts of this internship was being included in almost every meeting that the Director of Museum Relations attended, which gave me a better understanding and appreciation for how much planning goes into promoting the museum and the importance of community relationships and allowed me to meet some wonderful people in Charleston’s cultural community. If I’ve learned anything from this internship, it’s that the time spent cultivating partnerships with media outlets and sponsors is essential to the success of a museum.

I’ve also spent a lot of time working with the Program and Events Manager. Almost immediately after the sidewalks were swept following the Street Party, planning began on the next fundraising event, Bitters and Twisted in the Salon d’Orleans. Timed to coincide with the opening of one of the new exhibitions In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans, this event was organized by the Gibbes’ young professionals auxiliary group, Society 1858. I assisted with everything from researching options for hand-held fans to helping with set up on the day of the event. It’s impossible to understand the amount of time and dedication that goes into planning an event such as this unless you are involved with the preparations. Performers and caterers don’t magically appear the night of the event, poised and ready for a couple hundred guests. Months of research and decisions go into making the night so memorable and successful. I have a deeper appreciation for anyone that plans programs and events and I know I will be able to apply the experiences I’ve had this summer at the Gibbes in my professional career.

This internship at the Gibbes Museum has given me the confidence to begin a career in the museum and art world. I’ve learned and participated in more than I ever imagined I would and have enjoyed being a part of this amazing team!

Amanda Breen, Media Relations/Communications Summer Intern, Gibbes Museum of Art

Intern Perspective: Planning and Promoting Happenings at the Gibbes

Since January, I have been gifted with the opportunity to intern behind the scenes at the Gibbes. Before my internship began, I was not sure of what I was getting myself into. Of course my mind went to the two extremes: I would either be licking envelopes and getting coffee or I would be overwhelmed with tough work and little explanation. Instead, I have had an entirely different experience working as the Museum Relations intern for the past four months. I felt welcomed from day one and have truly enjoyed working with the small staff who are able to keep the successful museum flourishing.

Although I am from Rye, New York, I have grown up spending tons of my time in Charleston with both my immediate and my extended family and have always considered this amazing city my second home. I am a junior at the College of Charleston double majoring in Art History and Communication. Two summers ago I had the opportunity to work with Rebecca Sailor, the Associate Curator of Education, helping her with the Gibbes Summer Art Camp. That experience showed me what a great connection the museum truly had with its surrounding community. Last Fall, when I was considering taking on an internship during the school year my uncle and local artist, John Dunnan, suggested I apply to the Gibbes. Right away, I knew this was a brilliant idea and after meeting with Marla Loftus and Lasley Steever, I was thrilled to accept the position. Although I have interned at the museum before, the experience offered with the Public Relations and Event Planning departments seemed like an opportunity I should not refuse. I was told I would have a very hands-on position and learn both simple and complex tasks that would be beneficial in the long run.

The models' finalé walk on the Flirting with Art runway.

For the past four months I have been able to assist with Public Relations, Event Planning, and Social Media for the Gibbes. I have been fortunate to learn so much about several different things that are involved with all of these jobs. From posting press releases and managing PR mentions to planning parties and posting tweets, there is always something to get done. One of my favorite events that I was lucky enough to be a part of was Flirting with Art in February. I enjoyed helping organize and plan this extravagant and modern runway show and loved being there to experience all of the hard work put into action. It was exhilarating watching the process while local artists interpreted the art of modern painters with a mix of styles using the human body as the canvas.

Recently, I was able to get involved with the opening of open two new exhibitions commemorating the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War: A Soldier’s View of Civil War Charleston and Stephen Marc: Passage on the Underground Railroad. The extraordinary connections I have seen made between the permanent collection and the the temporary exhibitions has been awe-inspiring. I love working with people who share my passion for both art and education and hope that the Gibbes Museum will continue to thrive in this historical and artistic city. I have enjoyed my experience here at the Gibbes that has been filled with both learning and excitement and I hope to keep a close connection with all of the staff and members for a long time to come!

Clay Dunnan, Museum Relations Intern, January through May 2011

Old Friends Gather to Hear About New Plans

The first day of the February brought a lovely gathering of those who had participated in the former Gibbes Studio of Art School. The quirky, quaint house on Queen Street is now the location of the much-talked-about restaurant, Husk. Past instructors and students gathered to see what had been done to the building, and to reconnect and share memories of times at the Studio. Instructors such as Manning Williams (painting), Rhett Thurman (painting), Larry Workman (photography), Bill McCullough (painting), Mary Walker (printmaking), Kristi Ryba (printmaking), Yvette Dede (printmaking), Linda Fantuzzo (painting), Carol Ezell (drawing), Mary Nicholson (clay), Peggy Howe (printmaking), Barclay McCurdy (clay), and Elizabeth McKeever (painting) were present, as were staff and board members from the museum.

It was fun to notice that many of the former students of the Gibbes Studio are now artists showing and selling their creative works. Angela Mack, the museum’s director, presented the new plans for the first floor of the museum which will have classrooms and studios. The excited reaction from the group showed how much the school has been missed. I call the plans “new” but they are truly a return to the old which should please those who pine for the “old building” that was such a draw to students.

One summer I spent a week counting how many people entered the Studio building on Queen, so I know that those present at the reunion were but a few of the thousands who walked through the doors of the Studio school. Students brought their hopes for talent, their dreams for expanding their children’s horizons, and their faith that the instructors and staff would show them respite from the daily structure of life. There are also the many who took classes from Corrie McCallum, William Halsey, and Willard Hirsch in the museum itself. And we should not forget the off-site programs in the schools taught by Gibbes instructors and docents for over forty plus years. The energy of all those past and present was so apparent to anyone listening in the upstairs room we called the “nursery” (red carpet was put down at one point to make it a “quiet” room!).

The smart renovations at 76 Queen Street may take some getting used to for those who practically lived in the building over the years, taking or teaching classes. The clay studio—formerly the bookbindery—is now a cold storage for the delicacies served at Husk. Jean Smith, a long-time director of the Studio, always said that the buildings needed to rest during the month of August. Jean has since gone on to the land of permanent rest, and after a long rest the studio building has come back to life. Filled with the sounds of memories and many creative people, the Gibbes “reunion” was abuzz with great energy and the guests seemed ready for a new decade of Gibbes history to be made.

—Lese Corrigan, owner Corrigan Gallery, artist, and still a Gibbes instructor

Museum Mile Weekend: September 25 and 26

Museum Mile Weekend Logo

On September 25 and 26, 2010, the Gibbes will be partnering with other cultural institutions along and around Meeting Street to offer locals and tourists a single entry pass during the second annual Museum Mile Weekend. Charleston’s Museum Mile operates year-round with signage, brochures, and a website to help visitors navigate Charleston’s cultural corridor. However, on this one special weekend, we band together to offer one admission price.

The concept of Charleston’s Museum Mile was hatched several years ago by Dr. John Brumgardt, executive director of the Charleston Museum. The downtown cultural attractions had partnered on programs in the past but had not done much in the way of cooperative marketing and signage. The idea for the Charleston Museum Mile emerged as Dr. Brumgardt and representatives from other cultural institutions opened up a map of the Meeting Street area and plotted the many museums and historic sites that would be of interest to tourists and easy to navigate around. While the concept of a “Museum Mile” was not new and has proven a success in other cities, such as New York and London, the unique alliance formed by the cultural institutions and the inclusion of religious sites and parks put Charleston’s Museum Mile in a category of its own. By 2008, the grass-roots campaign to promote the Mile was in full swing largely in part to the dedication and collaborated vision of the participating organizations and institutions.

For one $20 pass (and only $10 for children 12 and under), passholders can visit thirteen cultural sites throughout the weekend.  If purchased separately, adult admission for these sites would be over $100! Sites participating in the upcoming Museum Mile Weekend are:

Many of the cultural institutions will also offer special programs during Museum Mile Weekend. The Gibbes will offer free docent-led tour at 2:30 on both Saturday and Sunday.

Passes for Museum Mile Weekend can be purchased at www.charlestonsmuseummile.org or at any Charleston Visitor Center location. Online purchasers will receive their passes in the mail so be sure and order your passes early. We hope you’ll take advantage of this terrific opportunity to sample Charleston’s cultural riches for this not-so-rich price!

Marla Loftus, Director of Museum Relations, Gibbes Museum of Art

An Evening at Bastille Café

Get your tickets for the next Society 1858 event on July 16 from 8-11pm. Celebrate Bastille Day at this fabulously French affair including les hors d’oeuvres and les boissons courtesy of Rue de Jean and jazz featuring Heddy Rae. This is an event you won’t want to miss!

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here or call (843) 722-2706, ext. 22.

Women’s Council Celebrates 60 Years

On April 22, the Women’s Council of the Carolina Art Association/Gibbes Museum of Art celebrated 60 years of supporting the museum. The Women’s Council, founded in 1950, celebrated the milestone by announcing a partnership with the Charleston Parks Conservancy to beautify the Gibbes Courtyard garden. Thank you to the Women’s Council for your incredible efforts over the past 60 years!

Angela Mack, Ginny Brush, and Elizabeth Bradham

Angela Mack, Ginny Brush, and Elizabeth Bradham

 

Kathy Nistad, Peggy Theoharous, and Lee Perry

Kathy Nistad, Peggy Theoharous, and Lee Perry

 

Susan Dickson, Glenna Greenslit, and Marlies Tindall

Susan Dickson, Glenna Greenslit, and Marlies Tindall

 

Past Presidents of the Women's Council

Past Presidents of the Women's Council

 

Photographs courtesy of Charleston Picture Company.

Take it to the Street Party

Here are a few photos from last month’s fabulous Take it to the Street Party that celebrated the opening of Modern Masters from the Ferguson Collection. For the festive affair the Gibbes shut down Meeting Street while guests enjoyed music, entertainment, and food by Charleston’s most celebrated chefs. Want to see more photos from the event? Click here to view the entire gallery of photographs by Charleston Picture Company.

Michael Doniger, Alice Wyatt, Janice Doniger, Hunter Higgison, and Lance Wyatt

Michael Doniger, Alice Wyatt, Janice Doniger, Hunter Higgison, and Lance Wyatt

 

Barbara Zimmerman and Janice Waring

Barbara Zimmerman and Janice Waring

 

Jim and Esther Ferguson with Mary and Sam Waters

Jim and Esther Ferguson with Mary and Sam Waters

 

Jane Anderson, Theresa and Roy Green, Dick Smartt

Jane Anderson, Theresa and Roy Green, Dick Smartt

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