2015 AAM Museum Expo and Conference

This week several Gibbes staff members traveled to Atlanta to attend the American Alliance of Museums Annual Meeting and Expo. The theme for this year’s event was “The Social Value of Museums; Inspiring Change.” There were over 180 program sessions over four days and each one of came away filled with new ideas and inspiration!

Rebecca Sailor, curator of education, says highlights from the conference include networking with other museum educators and learning how others continue to combine history and art to encourage school group visitation and programming. Before leaving town she was able to meet with some of the education staff at the High Museum of Art to learn more about their programming. 

Sara Arnold says that from a curatorial standpoint, it was inspiring learn-in this increasingly digital world-that original objects, artworks, and  the human stories they tell, remain an important and valued resource in our communities. However, museums today must strive to relate to their audiences by communicating these stories in compelling ways and in a variety of formats. Doug Hegley, director of media technology, Minniapolis Museum of Art, commented that “To remain viable, museums must rethink not only what types of knowledge they create, but how/with whom they create it, and finally how they communicate it.”* While digital devices will become more and more a part of our museum experience, when done properly, it will be the scholarly content and the original work of art, rather than the technology,  that is the star. Our goal with the reinstallation of the Gibbes permanent collection has been to communicate compelling and relatable stories for our visitors. We hope that our exhibitions, museum publications, labels and text panels, and any digital content we design will capture these captivating stories and inspire our visitors to engage with the museum on a regular basis. Sara says that the conference offered a refreshing opportunity to see the variety of ways in which museums are rediscovering their roles and their relevancy in the twenty first century.

Zinnia Willits at the AAM

Zinnia Willits at the AAM learning about 3D printing for the visually impaired

For the past several years Zinnia has served as the Fellowship Chair for the Registrars Committee (RC) of the American Alliance of Museums and holds a seat on the larger AAM Fellowship Task Force. As such, she is directly responsible for reviewing fellowship applications and offering travel stipends to collections care professionals to attend the Annual Meeting. Each year at AAM, she has the satisfaction of presenting the fellowship awards and meeting the recipients, many of whom would not be able to attend the Annual Meeting without a travel stipend. This year she presented nine travel fellowships to RC members and matched each recipient with a conference mentor from the RC Executive Board. While Zinnia took full advantage of all of AAM’s sessions and networking opportunities, meeting the fellowship recipients and seeing the direct value of her professional development endeavors to the larger museum community was one of the most gratifying aspects of attending AAM.

I was grateful to be awarded a marketing fellowship to attend the conference, and learned a great deal about building and engaging museum audiences. I attended a particularly informative session with the authors of “Magnetic: the Art and Science of Engagement,” and the Director of Communications from the Wallace Foundation who spoke about best practices for building arts audiences. 
Amy Mercer, Marketing and Communications Manager

Save the Date: May 5, 2015 #LiftTheLowcountry

Lowcountry Giving Day 2015

On May 5, 2015, we invite members of the entire community to participate in Lowcountry Giving Day, a 24-hour online fundraising event sponsored by the Coastal Community Foundation.  In 2014, Lowcountry Giving Day raised over $4M, the highest amount collected in 24 hours of giving in similar challenges among all 50 states.

This year the Gibbes Museum is participating and proceeds from this event will support the Gibbes capital campaign that will transform the Museum and provide a state-of-the art cultural center for the community.  It is hard to believe that in 2016 we will be moving back into a restored Beaux Arts building with innovative galleries and public spaces where art, technology, and interpretation blend to inspire explorations of the Museum’s collection.

Gibbes facade

Rendering of the renovated Gibbes Museum

Recently, a Gibbes patron stated that “an art museum is an invaluable cornerstone to civic coherence and cultural identity.” Refocusing on the Museum’s foundation as an academy-style institution will allow the Gibbes to serve as a center for content-rich arts education. Not only will the entire first floor serve as a center for education and community engagement, but also allow the on-site studios, classrooms, and lecture space to increase opportunities for hands-on, process-driven learning. A rear reception area and lecture facility, which link to the redesigned Lenhardt garden, will be perfect for corporate meetings or intimate dinners and receptions. In addition, the first floor will provide a pedestrian walkway along the historic Gateway Walk from sites on the Meeting Street Museum Mile to the busy King Street shopping district. A beautifully refurbished Museum store and a new café will greet visitors upon their entrance.

This renewal of the Gibbes, through a five-year, $13.4M capital campaign will offer visitors to Charleston an opportunity to understand the significant role Charleston has played and continues to play in the history of American art. With fully-restored galleries and exhibition spaces, and the installation of furniture and silver from the Rivers Collection of Southern Decorative Art, visitors will gain a comprehensive interpretation of the region’s exceptional artistic achievement during the 18th and early 19th centuries.

Since 2011, and during the silent phase of the campaign, pledges and contributions of $10.9 million have been received from the City of Charleston, Charleston County, and the Town of Kiawah Island as well as from individuals, foundations, and corporations. We are thrilled to have received national attention over the summer with the awards of $100,000 from The Henry Luce Foundation in New York, and $250,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington, DC.  Additionally, we received a $250,000 gift from BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina. This past December we also were fortunate to receive a generous grant from the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation in the amount of $150,000 for the miniature portrait collection. Since the start of our capital campaign, we have raised approximately $2.6M per year, which has put us in reach of our goal to raise $13.4 million by 2016. This is in addition to the $1 million raised annually to support operations.

Groundbreaking Ceremony, October 2014

Gibbes staff at the Groundbreaking Ceremony, October 2014

We still need your support! We are on the homestretch and we hope that you will consider supporting the Gibbes on May 5th through Lowcountry Giving Day. Even more exciting is that your gift will be increased by an incentive gift provided by generous donors. Visit lowcountrygivingday.org on that day to make an online gift or, if you prefer to send a check, please note that it will only be accepted from Monday, April 20 to Friday, April 24. For more information on the current renovation, please visit our renovation website to see the transformation or contact me Jen Ross, Director of Development at jross@gibbesmuseum.org or by phone at 843.722.2706 X16 for more information.

Jennifer Ross, director of development

Why Do You Support the Gibbes Museum of Art?

Boomtown employees

BoomTown employees

By Elizabeth Allen and Nina Magnesson of Boomtown

We are fortunate to have so many wonderful donors and sponsors whose support helps us provide innovative programs, exciting events, and engaging educational opportunities. Over the next few months we will introduce these talented people to you through our blog. Nina Magnesson, Community Relationship Manager of the real estate web platform, Boomtown and Elizabeth Allen, wife of Boomtown founder Grier Allen, were gracious enough to launch this series.

Q: Why did you become involved with the Gibbes Museum, or, how did you first learn about the museum and what was the process that led to your involvement?

Nina: BoomTown became involved with the Gibbes in 2013 through participation in Society 1858. A couple of Boomers were invited to participate on the Winter Party Planning Committee. BoomTown’s CEO and Co-founder Grier and his wife, Elizabeth Allen were invited to participate on the Winter Party Planning Committee the following year. BoomTown was also a sponsor of the 2014 party and the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art.

Q: Tell me about your company and your philanthropic mission. How do you hope to engage your employees in this mission and how can nonprofits such as the Gibbes help in the process?

Elizabeth: Personally, I believe that philanthropy has always been a big part of BoomTown since its launch. The company was thankful for the people and other companies who gave them a helping hand as they were beginning, and it became a part of their core value to engage in the community as BoomTown grew. Also, Grier has taught me that part of running a successful company is creating a space where people are thankful, have gratitude and understanding for where they are and what they are doing. There is not a better way to show that appreciation than by giving back to the community where you live, work and that you love!

Nina: BoomTown’s Philanthropic Mission (BoomTownLOVE) is to improve lives through social innovation by helping to create amazing experiences for the BoomTown Greater Charleston and extended family community. The goal of our giving strategy centers around BoomTown’s group-sourced Core Values:

  • Create Amazing Experiences
  • Stay Humble
  • Go For It
  • Spread Some Laughter & Have Some Fun
  • Do the Right Thing
  • Communicate Openly & Honestly
  • Do More with Less
  • Seek & Share Knowledge

BoomTown also has an annually rotating volunteer board called the BoomBassadors who promote awareness and facilitate participation with community organizations as well as ultimately decide how to allocate our annual philanthropic budget. Non-profits can help by bridging the gap between businesses and organizations through clear communication of their goals and top priority needs. They may also offer a variety of ways that employees can engage with the organization through volunteerism to help foster a sense of ‘pride of ownership’ and deepen the sense of belonging for new members of our community.

Q: Why in your opinion is an art museum important to our community?

Nina: A fine arts museum serves as the cultural anchor for a city and its residents. It is an asset that “every city resident owns” in much the same way as Mayor Riley refers to our outdoor public spaces. It is a center for visual art that is open to all ages from every socio-economic background; individuals, can experience the world of art where they would not have the opportunity to otherwise, can learn about local and world history through art and artifacts, and can explore new expressions and movements in art and technical innovations. An art museum is an invaluable cornerstone to civic coherence and cultural identity.

Art museums are one of the best ways to share our culture, past and present, with visitors as well as locals.  Museums teach us about where we live and the people who have shaped the lowcountry. Art is an amazing form of expression that we must continue to expose younger generations,” adds Elizabeth.

Q: What do you look forward to most about the new Gibbes scheduled to reopen in 2016?

Elizabeth: We are thrilled for the reopening of the Gibbes and cannot wait to see the new building as well as the new exhibits you all will bring. Visiting the Gibbes will truly be an event for both patrons and visitors. We appreciate all of the hard work and energy everyone is putting in to the reopening. We look forward to being a part of it!

Nina: BoomTown is especially looking forward to being able to regularly visit an arts center where we may see and learn about the museum’s collections as well as visiting exhibitions in the new open, well-lighted galleries, seeing interesting films and performances, volunteering in the digital art labs, and gathering in the new open spaces available around the museum.

To learn more about supporting the Gibbes Museum of Art, please visit gibbesmuseum.org/support or call Director of Development, Jen Ross at 843.722.2706 x16

Early Education and Eye Spy Art

When you observe curious, giggling, fidgeting four year-olds, it’s hard to imagine them as future businessmen and women. But these young minds are absorbing everything around them at a rapid rate and statistics show early education is the key to future academic success. (The young brain forms more than 700 neural connections every second!). However, only 54% of Hispanic and African American students in South Carolina graduate from high school, and more rural “dropout factories” exist here than in any other state in the country. Research shows that the opportunity gap between low and high income students begins before kindergarten and widens over time. This makes early educators a critical first line of defense against educational inequity.

First Steps_Dec_2

Eye Spy students at the First African Child Development Center

The Gibbes Museum of Art has partnered with Charleston County First Steps to introduce preschool children to the fundamentals of art in a hands-on way. Rebecca Sailor, Curator of Education, and a team of teaching artists and museum educators have joined with First Steps Child Development Centers to offer experiences with colors, shapes, lines, textures, portraits, landscapes and pictures that tell a story.

“Gibbes educators and teaching artists are assisting the child care centers teachers on how to use the visual arts to expand their classroom curriculum. They demonstrate using literature, music and theater as well as hands-on art to encourage deeper learning of shape, line and color. The children are now recognizing these concepts in the world around them. Because the Gibbes educators and teaching artists are working with teachers and children on a continuous basis, they are forming relationships and are eager to learn more,” says Mrs. Sailor.

Lorraine Powers, chair of the Charleston County First Steps board and former Gibbes board member sparked the initial idea to encourage more African-American families to engage with the Gibbes museum through Eye Spy, an in-school program originally designed to help Charleston County School District elementary students look at and talk about art. Gibbes’ museum educators work with classroom visual arts teachers throughout the school year, creating interactive lesson plans. Classroom visits, using objects from the Gibbes’ collection, and major artists highlight the elements of art, introduce broad explanations of style, and teach students to compare and contrast.

Mrs. Powers says, “I think it’s really important to expose all young children between the ages of three and five to a variety of experiences. Young children are like sponges and absorb everything. Who knows, there may be a Jonathan Green, Romare Bearden or David C. Driskell amongst them, but first they have to know/see what is possible.”

eye spy students

Museum Educator Elise Detterbeck teaching students about movement

In 2013 the pilot project was supported by the Continental Society, an international public service organization dedicated to the socioeconomic and cultural welfare of underprivileged children and youth, and Charleston County First Steps, who joined forces to provide funding for this endeavor. Charleston County First Steps helps to prepare young children to reach school healthy and ready to learn.  The Eye Spy First Steps program is now offered in seven child development centers including Carousel, Child & Family, First African, Van Buren, New Israel, NIA, and Foster’s led by Gibbes Museum educators and teaching artists.

“The Eye Spy program works with children who are not often exposed to visual art concepts and cultural art pieces. The program expands their world by introducing them to the artworks from the Gibbes Museum, as well as to art concepts in general. It’s been inspiring for me to see the children gain an appreciation for art and the joy it brings them. The children also discover that there is a wonderful art museum in their own city that they never knew about and now can’t wait to visit when the museum reopens! The Eye Spy program is designed in a really fun, engaging way that makes them really want to be part of the world of art,” says teaching artist Leonora Dechtiar.

We look forward to continuing this program and incorporating field trips to the museum when the Gibbes reopens in spring of 2016. Engaging the students with actual works of art allows for a richer experience for these young students. Paintings that have been discussed in the centers will be seen in their actual, full enormity, and richness of color.
Amy Mercer, Marketing and Communications Manager

Art Educator of the Week, Elise Detterbeck

Did you know we currently have 15 active museum educators and teaching artists teaching and collaborating! These hard working educators have great insight into the value of arts education and we’ve decided to profile them here! Meet our Art Educator of the Week, Elise Detterbeck

Else with Eye Spy students

Else with Eye Spy students

Why is art an important part of learning?  

I view art as a window to the world. We all need to look beyond our little corner of the world to expand our experiences and grow. Art shows us how people live and think today and in the past in the United States and all over the world. It helps us understand ourselves and others. I see this every time I work with children either at the Gibbes or in the schools. It doesn’t matter if it’s a traditional painting or a very modernistic sculpture. They look, they think, and they respond.

How long have you been teaching and why did you get involved in teaching?

When I chose French as my major in college, I never really thought about what I’d do with it. I floated into teaching and loved it. A new language is also a window to another world, and I really thrived on leading students into that new world. Teaching children how to talk about art is similar, but easier. It’s more open-ended, more forgiving, and more expansive. With art you can teach almost any subject and students can respond in an increasing variety of ways after learning to look, think, and then respond.

What is a favorite memory of introducing a student to the arts?

I have a lot of great memories of students looking at art, but this may be my new favorite:

With my third grade Eye Spy students we were talking about genre scenes, which we call “pictures that tell a story.”  I showed them on the Smart Board a picture of 3 of my grandchildren (ages 20 months, 5, & 8) squished together on a sofa, all reading books in their pajamas. We talked about the elements of art in that photo, the medium used and then we got into the Who? What? When? Where? Why? game to figure out the “story.” They decided very quickly that these were (who?) 3 siblings (what?) reading their favorite books (where?) in their home (when) on a day off from school (why?) due to a snowstorm. Then all of a sudden, they said: “Wait a minute, are those YOUR grandchildren?” What thrilled me was that they could, from the picture, support every assumption they made, without any help from me.

For over 100 years, education has been central to the mission of the Gibbes. Serving more than 15,000 preK-12th grade students each year, the Gibbes interactive programs develop intellectual and aesthetic skills while addressing South Carolina Learning Standards. We are so grateful to have the support of educators like Elise who have been instrumental to the success of these programs.

To learn more about the value of art education, here are a few recent articles:

What to do if your Child’s First Love is Art?

Art Education Poised for a Comeback in Nation’s Largest School Districts

Bringing Back What Works in Education

Q & A with Architect, Joe Schmidt

Joe Schmidt

Joe Schmidt and Rick Fisher at the Groundbreaking Ceremony in October, 2014

Evans & Schmidt Architects has designed a wide range of projects since it was established in 1984. The primary focus, however, has remained unchanged over the past twenty-nine years. Evans & Schmidt Architects has openly embraced the challenge of targeting new and existing construction in the dense historic fabric of downtown Charleston and the surrounding Lowcountry. These include private residences, corporate offices, retail, municipal buildings, as well as academic and performing arts projects.  The firm has been the Architect of Record for the renovation and preservation of numerous properties individually registered as National Historic Landmarks. Joe Schmidt was kind enough to answer some questions about the museum renovations.

How did you become involved with this project?

In 2006, Angela Mack and I worked together on the renovation of City Hall. She coordinated the removal, off-site storage, and eventual return of City Hall’s permanent extensive art collection within the Council Chambers. Restoring the Council Chambers to its pre-1886 earthquake floor plan presented unique challenges as we sought to better showcase the art for all to enjoy while also maximizing the available seating space for the public wishing to attend council meetings. We also enhanced the environmental indoor control system to ensure the art is protected to the highest possible standards.

Describe your design process, for example, what specific challenges did this 100+ year old building pose?

The Gibbes was constructed very stoutly of solid masonry in 1905, but absolutely without any physical accommodation space for running any electrical piping or air conditioning. Consequently, as those necessities were added over the years, the ceilings were repeatedly lowered, which totally changed the character of its many spaces.  The challenge was to selectively redesign and consolidate these modern day necessities, incorporate additional life safety features, and then restore as much of the original spatial character as possible.

How will the renovation change the visitor’s experience?

The original building was incredibly open, dependent entirely on natural light and a few gas light fixtures to illuminate the interior. Over the years, as more gallery hanging space became needed and exhibit layout fashions changed, the natural light was eventually blacked out entirely. Our hope is that future visitors will embrace the far brighter renovated spaces that better connect the indoor gallery spaces with the outdoor garden. Because of advancements in glass protected surfaces, the additional sunlight will not harm the artwork and sculpture on display.

 What aspect of the renovated museum do you think will have the biggest impact on the visitor’s experience? 

Being able to step through the front door and see clearly through the building all the way to the beautifully redesigned Lenhardt garden in the rear, then looking right or left and glimpsing for the first time ever the marble flanking staircases enticing you to venture upstairs. A physical visual relationship with the exterior is maintained at all levels, which is contributory in helping to lower stress and increase stamina.

Joe Schmidt

Joe and Mayor Riley on a hard hat tour, February, 2015

Why is this project important to Charleston?

The renovation restores not only the façade, but encourages the public to once again freely walk down the 1905 hallways and observe active art studio work and classes taking place on a daily basis as was originally envisioned in 1905. This practice has been discontinued since the 1960s. The Gibbes Museum is one of Charleston’s preeminent cultural institutions and this renovation will ensure that the future needs of the museum are best addressed while restoring this 110 year old building as close as possible to its original condition and mission.

Can you give us some behind the scenes glimpses of what’s happening right now with the renovations?

The building has been undergoing extensive interior demolition work since December. This includes the removal of added partitions and antiquated electrical utilities in careful preparation for the expansion of appreciably more spacious galleries and event spaces. This dismantling work will continue for several more months before any actual renovation work will be observable from the street. In the meantime, pilings have been driven for the new extension on the building’s south side to house a new first class art delivery and storage facility.

Gibbes facade

Rendering of the renovated Gibbes Museum

To learn more about the renovations, please visit our renovation website!

The Art of Social Healing Through Sculpture and Public Art

In 2011, U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel and S.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Jean Toal held a symposium in Charleston to mark the 50th anniversary of the Briggs v. Elliott ruling. This ruling led to the creation of a committee that raised about $125,000 to commission a statue to honor U.S. District Judge J. Waties Waring; the man whose anti-segregation rulings made him a pariah in his hometown, but set the table for the Civil Rights Movement.

In “‘A liberating force,’ Waring returns to Charleston” Post and Courier journalist Robert Behre writes that a dozen sculptors sought to create the bronze likeness of Waring, and Rick Weaver, a sculptor from Charlottesville, Va., won the commission. Mr. Weaver was kind enough to take the time to answer questions about his work and to describe the process of creating this important sculpture. Mr. Weaver will join artist Jonathan Green and Dr. Jeb Hallett on March 10 for a panel discussion on The Art of Social Healing Through Sculpture and Public Art at the Charleston Federal Courthouse on Broad Street.

Judge Waites Waring sculpture

Final version of the Judge Waties Waring sculpture

How did you originally get interested and trained in sculpture?

I actually received my training not in sculpture, but in drawing and painting in New York, and then received my graduate degree in painting at UNC-Greensboro.  Whether you are working in charcoal, paint, clay, or any other medium, the underlying principles in art do not vary.  So when I became more interested in sculpture, I was able to essentially teach myself the procedure. I gradually moved my focus to sculpture in the last 10 years because the ideas I wanted to express seemed to have ultimately more to do with creating a shape in space, and depended less on creating an illusion on a 2 dimensional surface.

Describe the process of how you got to know Waties Waring in order to design your statue of him?

I first read the biography “A Passion for Justice” to get a feel for the man and his accomplishments.  It was also very helpful to speak with members of the sculpture committee, who had a familiarity with his judicial and social history in Charleston. Ultimately, I feel I can only really know myself – I never feel that I can truly understand another person in any comprehensive way, and I therefore never feel capable of “capturing” someone else in a sculpture. What I do is try to identify some vital aspect of someone’s character that I also recognize in myself, and then try to make the sculpture about that emotion or idea. With Judge Waring, I identified very closely with the idea that he was embattled, and pressured to do things he knew were wrong. Yet he persevered in his own beliefs of what was right and was true to his nature, despite the condemnation of his peers. (Not that I equate his courage with anything I possess, but I think there is some modest echo of what he displayed in all of us). Most good sculptures ultimately rise above the individual depicted, his or her gender, race, and personal history, and touch on themes that are universal and felt by all humanity. To what degree I was successful in this attempt is for others to judge, but that was my goal with the Judge Waring sculpture.

Just how does one make a statue of this magnitude? Briefly describe the manufacturing process.

On the manufacturing end, I will say that very early on, for the reasons given above, it was clear the statue should be in a standing position, to show Judge Waring’s resolute physical stance as a powerful metaphor for the intellectual stance he took in his judicial decisions. I worked on a life-size scale in my studio, beginning with a foam and aluminum armature, and progressing to a wax modeling of the actual figure.  I have included images which may illustrate the process better than my words. This final sculpture was then put in the capable hands of Carolina Bronze Foundry who completed all casting processes necessary to convert my wax sculpture into the final bronze.

Rick Weaver's sculpture of Judge Waites Waring

Beginning stage of the Judge Waites Waring sculpture

Did this project in any way impact your own personal feelings about the Civil Rights Movement and the sacrifice of champions like Judge Waring?

My knowledge of American History, let alone the Civil Rights Movement, is not what it should be.  So I am always very thankful for the excuse to research historical figures to fill in the gaps of my early education. I always feel that if my initial schooling had centered on integrating academic subjects with art I would have retained a lot more information. In reading about Civil Rights heroes like Judge Waring, John Chavis, or Maggie Walker, I am struck by their relentless courage in the face of opposition. The example of fortitude in mere mortals, however elevated by history, makes that kind of courage more accessible to me in some way that I may not have felt if I had not read their histories.

Related articles:

A liberating force,’ Waring returns to Charleston by Robert Behre, Post and Courier

Judge J. Waties Waring: Charleston’s Insider Agitator by Robert Rosen, Post and Courier

Judge Remembered For Landmark Role He Played In Desegregating Schools by Bruce Smith, Huffington Post

Rick Weaver received his formal training in New York at the National Academy of Design, the New York Academy, and the Art Students League. He earned his Master of Fine Arts from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, where he was influenced by the sculptor Billy Lee.

Jonathan Green’s painting “Breath of Freedom,” depicts  a crowd of people outside the Charleston federal courthouse listening to the trial Briggs vs. Elliot. He donated a copy of this painting to every public high school in the Charleston County school district. Green’s painting was presented at the Hollings Judicial Center Garden on April 11, 2014, the same day as the Judge Waties Warning sculpture dedication.

This event is at full capacity but you can learn more about our Art of Healing series by signing up for our e-newsletter, following us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, and checking our online calendar.

Thank you to Dr. Jeb Hallett who formulated the questions for Mr. Weaver and who will be moderating Tuesday night’s panel discussion. The Art of Healing is sponsored by Roper St. Francis.

Art of Healing, Understanding the Five Elements

Q&A with Lisa Dunlevy

AOH_march

 

Please explain the psychology of the five elements.

The Five Elements are stages of transformation: Water (birth), Wood (growth), Fire (ripening), Earth (harvest), and Metal (decay). They are different aspects of nature, as are we, and are known as “Wu Xing.” There are numerous parallels to each element including a corresponding season, climate, emotion, sound, smell, archetype, and even an organ.

For example, the wood element corresponds to springtime and the experience of walking outside, seeing the buds in the trees, and feeling hopeful. Watching the green sprouting from the ground, the trees, and vines is a visual experience and the element wood connects with having a vision, a plan, and a sense of creativity. Maybe you know someone with a lot of creative rising energy, or someone who lacks vision and doesn’t have a plan. This would be examples of how we are either gifted, or deficient in this element. All five elements are found within the individual, but there is one element that stands out and determines how we relate to the world.

How do you determine someone’s element?

When a new client calls me I listen to her/his voice. Then I also take into account what is ailing them, what part of the body is involved, are they frustrated with their condition, are they overwhelmed, have they waited a long time to call, or do they want to get this resolved immediately? When they are come into the office, do they move quickly, or slowly, what do they do for a living? These are all pieces to observe who that person is and to determine their constitutional element. Then we can move onto the virtues of each element, which helps with healing and becoming aligned with our purpose. The virtues of each element are Wisdom, Listening (water), Benevolence (wood), Partnership, and Truth (fire), Thoughtfulness and Support (earth), and Respect (metal). We aspire to have all of these, but one is most important to us. This part can also become taxed or imbalanced, and becoming our best selves and recognizing our natural talents can be very healing.

Can you explain what participants can expect from this workshop?

The class will consist of an introduction into the five element theory. We will also take a short quiz to evaluate which element we align with. Then we will either have a few volunteers share about their element, or gather in groups of each element. We will also have time to address questions, and then we will practice the Dance of The Phoenix Qi Gong practice.

What are the benefits of Qi Gong Practice? What does this type of movement involve?

Qi gong is a beautiful practice of moving our bodies to open the various meridians and bring harmony back to our bodies and mind.  It is best described as a moving meditation that uses our breath and bodily movements to open blocked meridians and support the flow of qi or energy.  It is a practice that helps us become more vital and calm, which is a beautiful combination.

Finally, how do you describe the connection between art and healing?

Learning about the five elements allows for healing as we recognize that we all have a unique gift or genius, that our challenges can also be our strengths and when we are aligned with our ‘dao’ we can find our purpose.

Join us to discover your element in Understanding the Five Elements with Lisa Dunlevy on Tuesday, March 3 from 5:30-7:30pm.

Location: Hazel Parker Community Center, 70 East Bay Street

$35 Members, $45 Non-Members

A Magical Mystery Tour of the Gibbes, by Elizabeth Gumb

Where the Gibbes is going, and where the Gibbes has been, certainly isn’t a mystery, but the amount of planning, creating, and excitement that has gone into Society 1858’s Winter 2015 party has been, frankly, magic. By “magic,” I mean, it’s amazing how easily things have fallen into place for this party. The generosity and involvement of our local vendors, venues, artists, sponsors, and patrons have really been the driving force behind this party (and of course, Lasley Steever, Director of Programs & Events at the Gibbes Museum)!

Magical Mystery Tour

I couldn’t be more excited or honored to co-chair, along with Kristin Romness, the first “off-campus” party! For the last four years our annual winter party has been held inside the museum, but due to the renovations, we’ve had to look elsewhere for a venue. While it has been overwhelming at times knowing that we were responsible for pulling off this unique event at another space, it has also allowed us to be as creative as we possibly could. For example, we were able to toy with different themes, formality, and ideas depending on which venue we decided upon, and the Woolfe Street Playhouse could not be more perfect for this British mod-pop Beatles party. Think psychedelic colors, swinging 60s set-up, and anglophile style. Beats by DJ Jeff will spin throughout the night for the ultimate dance party.  Guests will love the appropriately themed eats by Tristan and drinks by Striped Pig Distillery and Westbrook Brewery. But of course in true Gibbes style, we will have a few tricks up our sleeves as well.

Studio 54, MCG Photography

A party scene from last year’s winter party, Studio 54, MCG Photography

This is a party with a purpose because proceeds go to support the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art, which is open to artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, or Virginia and includes a $10,000 cash price for an artist whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. That’s why we are so excited to offer guests the chance to win a piece by one of the following contemporary southern artists: Charles Ailstock, Brian Coleman, John Duckworth, Richard Hagerty, Christopher Holt, Robert Lange, Megan Lange, Hirona Matsuda, Andrew Smock, Kate Long Stevenson, Lulie Wallace, John Westmark, and Ben Gately Williams. I have both of my fingers crossed for winning! Prices start at $15!

The fourth-annual party is sure to be a groovy gig, so I hope you get your tickets before it sells out!

58 Winter Party: The Magical Mystery Tour
Friday, February 20, 8-11pm
$70 Society 1858 Members, $95 Non Society 1858 Members
$130 Ticket, plus an Individual Membership for the Gibbes Museum and Society 1858 ($10 Discount)
Location: Woolfe Street Playhouse, 34 Woolfe Street

Elizabeth Gumb

Elizabeth Gumb, Co-Chair Magical Mystery Tour and Society 1858 Board Member

 

 

 

 

Art To Go Teachers Inspiring Young Minds!

Arts education provides students with a sense of personal worth and fosters an appreciation for creativity and innovation. Education specialists across the county agree that effective arts education promotes self-directed learning, sharpens critical thinking skills, develops self- awareness, improves school attendance, and encourages positive behavior! These are just a few of the reasons we have developed education outreach programs like Art to Go. Working in partnership with Charleston County School District Title I schools, Art to Go combines art making and instruction through experiences with real works of art. Gibbes Teaching Artists work with art teachers in six schools on a specific project or to complement their curriculum. Each year Art to Go collaborates with the Charleston Marathon, which benefits the Youth Endowment for the Arts. Completed projects were on display at the Marathon Expo in January.

Art To Go Project

Art To Go Project from Mitchell Elementary. Teaching Artist Leonora Dechtiar

Each year the Art to Go grows in strength and numbers! We asked each of the four art teachers to share a few words with us about their experience in the classroom.  Sally Collins, a long time Gibbes teaching artist, was not available for an interview, but you can see her student’s work pictured below.

Art To Go

Art To Go Project From Pinehurst Elementary, Teaching Artist Sally Collins

Q. How many years have you been involved in Art to Go and how do you decide on your project each year?

Kristen: This was my third year working with Art to Go. Each year I try to plan a project that is inclusive to all ages, while also using different art forms and mediums. This year we created a large paper mache Angel Oak tree sculpture. This was the first time many of the students had created such a large work, used paper mache, and made a sculpture. The students took pride in the assembly of the tree and helped each other apply the wet sheets of paper around our wire frame to build the tree. Fourth and fifth graders tied and cut out leaves, work that required a lot of patience and detail. Each week the classes would come in to check the tree’s progress to see it go from a wire frame to a wet paper mache base to a fully painted trunk to then being full of branches and leaves.

Art To Go

Art To Go from Angel Oak Elementary, Teaching Artist Kristen Solecki

Leonora:

I have been involved in Art to Go twice, once in 2012 and again this year. I decided on the concept for the projects based on what grades I’d be working with, what materials were available, and what the kids would benefit from. For example, the first year we created a clay mosaic because I had access to a kiln for firing the clay. This year, we also made a mural but instead we used a mix of different materials, such as paper, paint, aluminum foil, and model magic clay. I made sure to use materials the students normally didn’t work with or worked with rarely, so that they could learn something new.

Hannah:

This was my first year with the program!  I researched different ideas, and met with my teachers a few weeks before class to discuss what their thoughts were.  The projects ended up being collaborative ideas between what we thought would be really fun, but also informative.

Q. Tell me about your student’s experiences with art. What do you hope they walk away with or remember about creating art?

Kristen:

From my experience it seems that art class is one of the opportunities  that students look forward to most. It is the opportunity to learn new mediums, work with your hands, and a place where all skill levels are welcome because uniqueness is encouraged.

Leonora:

I think what my students remember the most from their experience is the joy of using materials they have never used and exploring those materials with a sense of excitement and curiosity. I think it’s special for them to have a guest come in to their art room and this excitement carries over to their art making. I think art is primarily about having fun and expressing one’s creativity, and if we achieved that, I think that’s the most important goal. The other thing my students took away from it was an exposure to the Gibbes Museum and their connection to the history and art of Charleston, which is so important for them.

Hannah:

I hope that they hold on to the feeling that comes with creating something that you’re really proud of.

Q: How do you think art enhances education?

Kristen:

Art enhances education in countless ways. Through these projects I can see first-hand how art teaches not only new skills and techniques for making art, but also how to work as a team, problem solve, and be creative.

Leonora:

Art, unlike many other subjects, gives the children an opportunity to use their hands and develop their fine motor skills, which is important to have in any future career. Also, art gives children an opportunity to expand and practice using their creativity and imagination. Without creativity, I don’t think you could be a good scientist. Also, art gives students a chance to relax, have fun, and unwind from a day that may be filled with stress. I noticed that when the kids worked with clay in the art room, they were relaxed when molding the clay. I think art has a therapeutic effect in children and can relieve stress, which allows them to focus more on other subjects.

Hannah:

Art helps people express themselves in a way that’s different than other educational activities. Instead of writing something down, or acting something out, kids are given the opportunity to physically create something that’s completely their own.  That’s an accomplishment in itself, and I think it helps build a sense of confidence and self-worth.

Arttogo_blog2

Bios:

Kristen Solecki is an illustrator and art educator that uses paint and ink to translate stories and moments using strong changeable line work and bold color.  She has created work for publications such as Taproot Magazine, Uppercase Magazine, Skirt Magazine, the television show, Mad Men, as well as for galleries and shops across the U.S. You can see her work at www.kristensolecki.com

Leonora Dechtiar has her BFA in Illustration from Maine College of Art and her Masters of Arts in Teaching from Savannah College of Art and Design. She studied art for a semester in  Spain, where she developed a deep appreciation for art history. She loves illustrating for children, and  has published with Studio 9, Inc., which publishes educational materials and coloring books for children. After getting her certificate in art education, Leonora has worked as an art teacher at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC for two years. She also spent a year and a half in Beijing, China teaching art at an international Montessori school.

Hannah Durant grew up in Alexandria, VA and went to college at Elon University. After she graduated, she moved back to Virginia to get a “real” job and quickly realized that wasn’t her path.  Hannah has spent the last two years in Charleston, SC working with creative businesses in different capacities, and building on her interests.

Sally Collins holds a Commercial Art Degree, Bachelor of Social Science Degree, and Master in Teaching (MIT) Degree. She has previously taught Art, English, and 4th grade at the First Baptist School in Mt. Pleasant,  1st and 3rd grade at Midland Park Elementary in Charleston County as well as Art at Trident Academy in Mt. Pleasant. She has served as a Gibbes Teaching Artist for over 5 years with experience in summer camp, after school classes as well as Art to Go.

« Previous PageNext Page »