CLOSED. OPEN TOMORROW AT 10
OPEN

Spring in Charleston, 1925, by Childe Hassam

Spring in Charleston, 1925, by Childe Hassam

Spring in Charleston, 1925
By Childe Hassam (American, 1859 – 1935)
Etching on paper; 7 ¼ x 11 ¾ inches
Gibbes Museum of Art (1993.003)
Enlarge

Between late March and early April 1925, Childe Hassam traveled south to Savannah, Georgia, stopping in Baltimore, Richmond, and Charleston along the way. Though he likely arrived in Charleston while the city’s vibrant spring foliage was nearing its peak, the renowned American Impressionist chose to depict his surroundings in black-and-white. However, his etchings emphasized the significance of the city’s native vegetation; while the focal point of Spring in Charleston is the striking entrance of a Charleston single house, the adjacent garden illustrated in the print is barely restrained by the iron fencing depicted in the foreground. The abundant shrubs and vines intertwine the fence posts, climb the balcony banisters, and frame the grand doorway, demonstrating the close interconnection between the city’s historic architecture and lush gardens.

< Back to Outside Perspectives: Visiting Artists in Charleston

Related Content

International Perspectives

In February 2014, the Gibbes took a group of museum members on a trip to Cuba. I was lucky enough to travel with the group and it was an incredible…

READ MORE

The Colorful Collector behind the Black and White Photographs

The selection of fourteen photographs by major twentieth-century photographers now on view in Gallery 3 in the exhibition Magic in the Mundane: Modernist Photography features works by modern masters like…

READ MORE

THE DAILY BY BUTCHER & BEE ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH THE GIBBES MUSEUM

Introducing The Daily at the Gibbes: Beginning in early-2018, The Daily will assume operations of the Gibbes Museum Café installing a new concept and serving favorites from the Upper King…

READ MORE

Looking Back to Summer Fun

For the first time ever, the Gibbes offered a summer teen camp for ages 13 and up. Two week-long portrait study sessions were offered in June and July. Long-time Gibbes…

READ MORE