When the Gibbes Museum opened in 1905, the nation celebrated what Charleston has always understood: the power of art – to inspire our imagination, heal our hurt, and nourish our souls.

Mending a Break in a Rice-Field Bank, from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties

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Mending a Break in a Rice-Field Bank, from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties

Pre-Conservation
Mending a Break in a Rice-Field Bank, from the series A Carolina Rice Plantation of the Fifties, ca. 1935
By Alice Ravenel Huger Smith (American, 1876 – 1958)
Watercolor on paperboard
Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of the artist (1937.009.0026)

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A Commitment to Conservation: Alice Smith’s Rice Plantation Series

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