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OPEN TODAY 10-5pm
OPEN
the gibbes museum of art
Digital collage by Concept Rxch

Artistic Visionaries

April 29, 2023 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Gibbes Museum of Art

BUY TICKETS

The art world is anything but static. Join us for a panel discussion highlighting artists working on the edge and leading the way. This year we’ll host artists working with NFTs and digital arts, pushing the boundaries of what art is and who is classified as an artist.

$30 Members | $40 Non-Members
A 3% Credit card fee will apply

OUR SPEAKERS:

Carla Gannis is a transmedia artist based in Brooklyn, New York. She has an upcoming exhibition at the Halsey WWWUNDERKAMMER in May. She produces works that consider the uncanny complications between grounded and virtual reality, nature and artifice, science and science fiction in contemporary culture. Fascinated by digital semiotics, Gannis takes a horror vacui approach to her artistic practice, culling inspiration from networked communication, art and feminist histories, emerging technologies and speculative design.

Damian Stamer is an 1858 Prize Finalist (2019) whose first museum exhibition Ruminations is currently on view. Stamer’s work considers the intersection of past and present, and how new technologies and modes of expression influence traditional approaches to painting. Ruminations includes a selection of paintings informed by the use of artificial intelligence. Rather than painting from photographs as source material, Stamer used an artificial intelligence text-to-image generator to create source imagery, resulting in innovative paintings titled the Collaboration series.

Concept Rxch: CONCEPT RXCH is a Charleston native who hails from West Ashley. Exploring digital, video, and sound collage, he designed the original poster for the Gibbes Museum event Improvised: A Hip Hop Experience inspired by the past Romare Bearden exhibition. RXCH creates striking images that highlight a variety of themes and concepts. Some of RXCH's biggest influences include Italian artist Carvaggio (1571-1610) and South Carolina's own Jonathan Green (b. 1955), whose works feature different stylistic approaches.